https://engineering.wustl.edu/Profiles/Pages/Philip-Bayly.aspx81Philip Bayly<img alt="Philip Bayly" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Bayly_Phil.jpg?RenditionID=6" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Department Chair & ProfessorPhilip Bayly - Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science - Develops imaging methods to study biomechanics from cell motility to traumatic brain injury<div>​​​PhD, Duke University, 1993</div><div>MSc, Brown University, 1987</div><div>AB, Dartmouth College, 1986</div><p>  <a href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=wY-Wy6IAAAAJ&hl=en"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/gscholar.png" alt="" style="margin: 0px 0px -5px;"/> Google Scholar</a><br/></p><div> <span><hr/></span><strong>Affiliations</strong><div style="text-align: left;"><ul><li><a href="http://cbac.wustl.edu/default.asp" style="font-size: 0.9em;">Cardiac Bioelectricity & Arrhythmia Center (CBAC)</a></li><li><a href="/departments-faculty/interdisciplinary-degree-programs/imaging-science/Pages/default.aspx" style="font-size: 0.9em;">Imaging Science PhD Program</a><br/></li></ul></div></div>https://sites.wustl.edu/baylylab/<p>​Depart​ment Chair</p><p>The Lilyan & E. Lisle Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering</p><h3>Expertise<br/></h3><p>Mechanics of cells and soft tissues; nonlinear dynamics; waves and oscillations<br/></p><h3>Research</h3><p>Professor Bayly studies impact, vibration, wave motion, and instability in mechanical and biomedical systems. He uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the mechanics of brain injury and brain development. He also studies the nonlinear dynamic phenomena that underlie the oscillatory movements of cells and microorganisms.​</p><h3>​Biography</h3><p>Professor Bayly has been a member of the faculty at Washington University since 1993. In 1996, he was the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. In 2004, he was awarded Engineering Professor of the Year and he has twice received the School of Engineering & Applied Science "Big Fish" Award for graduate student mentoring​. <br/><br/>From 1988 to 1990, Professor Bayly worked as an engineer for Pitney Bowes in Stamford, CT and for the Shriners Hospital in Springfield, MA.</p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/ResearchImages/Bayly_research.jpg?RenditionID=13" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​314-935-6081<br/><a href="mailto:pvb@wustl.edu">pvb@wustl.edu</a><br/>Jubel Hall, Room 125G<br/></p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCV9cEE-i5o">play video</a><div class="ms-rtestate-read ms-rte-wpbox" contenteditable="false"><div class="ms-rtestate-notify ms-rtestate-read d02f6946-77ba-40c8-b425-7dbdf0593967" id="div_d02f6946-77ba-40c8-b425-7dbdf0593967" unselectable="on"></div><div id="vid_d02f6946-77ba-40c8-b425-7dbdf0593967" unselectable="on" style="display: none;"></div></div><ul style="margin-top: -10px;"><li> <a href="/news/Pages/3-D-mapping-babies-brains.aspx">3-D mapping babies’ brains</a></li><li> <strong>Quartz: </strong> <a href="https://qz.com/1136683/everything-we-know-about-concussions-is-wrong/">Everything we know about concussions is wrong</a><br/></li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Studying-the-brains-suspension-system-in-TBIs.aspx">Studying the brain’s suspension system in TBIs</a><br/></li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Faculty-team-awarded-125-million-to-study-swimming-cells.aspx">Faculty team awarded $1.25 million to study ‘swimming cells’</a><br/></li></ul>

 

 

These St. Louis Scientists Are Shaking Human Brains To Study Head Traumahttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/These-St-Louis-Scientists-Are-Shaking-Human-Brains-To-Study-Head-Trauma.aspxThese St. Louis Scientists Are Shaking Human Brains To Study Head Trauma
Multi-institutional team to study effects of age, gender on brain injury mechanicshttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Multi-institutional-team-to-study-effects-of-age,-gender-on-brain-injury-mechanics.aspxMulti-institutional team to study effects of age, gender on brain injury mechanics
Trap-and-release accelerates study of swimming ciliated cellshttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Trap-and-release-accelerates-study-of-swimming-ciliated-cells.aspxTrap-and-release accelerates study of swimming ciliated cells
Making waves: Researchers shed light on how cilia workhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Making-waves-Researchers-shed-light-on-how-cilia-work.aspxMaking waves: Researchers shed light on how cilia work
Bayly, team to study brain’s white matter with new imaging techniquehttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Bayly,-team-to-study-brain’s-white-matter-with-new-imaging-technique.aspxBayly, team to study brain’s white matter with new imaging technique
Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brainhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Bad-Vibes-How-Hits-To-The-Head-Are-Transferred-To-The-Brain.aspxBad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain