https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/A-first-look-at-McKelvey-Hall.aspx856A first look at McKelvey Hall<p>​It’s the final piece of the East End Transformation at Washington University in St. Louis, and new renderings of James M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall demonstrate how the building will incorporate seamlessly into the project.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/View-McKelvey-courtyard-1sqd5es-1024x561.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​McKelvey Hall, named in honor of James M. McKelvey Sr., for 27 years the dean of the <a href="http://engineering.wustl.edu/">School of Engineering & Applied Science</a>, will be located south of Preston M. Green Hall. While it will include faculty spaces and labs from each of the school’s five departments, McKelvey will also house the entire Department of Computer Science & Engineering, supporting Washington University’s data science efforts.</p><p>“Everyone is excited to get this first look at McKelvey Hall,” said <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Aaron-Bobick.aspx">Aaron Bobick, dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science and the James M. McKelvey Professor.</a> “This magnificent building will help further the school’s vision of academic excellence and research collaboration, serving as a hub for our growing computer and data science programs. It’s terrific to see it begin to come to life in these new renderings.”</p><p>McKelvey Sr.’s vision helped transform the School of Engineering & Applied Science from a regional program to a nationally recognized research institution. During his more than quarter-century tenure as dean, he led the school to prominence in engineering research, education and innovation.</p><p>McKelvey Hall — made possible by a $15 million lead commitment gift from Washington University alumnus and McKelvey’s son Jim Jr. — will also include faculty offices, research laboratories and student learning spaces, supporting the university’s overall vision.<br/></p><p>“McKelvey Hall, along with the other east end projects, will help set the course for the next era of academic achievement and service to society, both at the School of Engineering & Applied Science and Washington University as a whole,” Bobick said. “It will be a fitting reminder of Dean McKelvey’s innovation and leadership, and how he always looked for new ways in which engineering can impact both our local community and the world.”</p><p>Construction is expected to be completed in 2020.<br/></p><p style="text-align: center;"><img src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU-McKelvey-Hall-from-Skinker-21dgg0m.jpg" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/><span style="caret-color: #4c4c4c; color: #4c4c4c; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Rendering showing McKelvey Hall from Skinker Boulevard.</span><br/></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="caret-color: #4c4c4c; color: #4c4c4c; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"><br/></span></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="caret-color: #4c4c4c; color: #4c4c4c; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"></span><img src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU-East-End-Transformation-aerial-view-1dirtdo.jpg" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/><span style="caret-color: #4c4c4c; color: #4c4c4c; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Aerial view showing the master plan for the East End Transformation.</span></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="caret-color: #4c4c4c; color: #4c4c4c; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"><br/></span></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="caret-color: #4c4c4c; color: #4c4c4c; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"></span><img src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU-East-End-McKelvey-plan-rendering-25unpel.jpg" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/><span style="color: #444444; font-family: "segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85098); text-align: center;">Overhead view of the transformation of the east end of Danforth campus with the new McKelvey Hall, at top right, near Skinker Boulevard.</span></p><p>​<br/></p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Campus Next<br/></h3><div><ul><li> <b style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="https://campusnext.wustl.edu/webcams/">Webcams</a></b><br/></li><li> <b style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="https://campusnext.wustl.edu/items/henry-a-and-elvira-h-jubel-hall/">Jubel Hall </a></b><br/></li><li> <b style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="https://campusnext.wustl.edu/items/james-m-mckelvey-sr-hall/">McKelvey Hall</a></b></li></ul></div></div></span>A view of the interior courtyard of McKelvey Hall.campusnext.wustl.eduhttps://campusnext.wustl.edu/2018/04/23/a-first-look-at-mckelvey-hall/2018-04-24T05:00:00ZMcKelvey Hall, named in honor of James M. McKelvey Sr., for 27 years the dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science, will be located south of Preston M. Green Hall. Construction is expected to be completed in 2020.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/2018-Discovery-Competition-Finalists-selected.aspx8552018 Discovery Competition finalists selected<p>​Four teams have been chosen as finalists for the 2018 <a href="/current-students/outside-classroom/discovery-competition/Pages/default.aspx">Discovery Competition</a>. The winning teams will be chosen at 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 24 in Rodin Auditorium in Green Hall.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Discovery-Competition-1230x431.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>The finalists are:<br/></p><p><strong>CyberPowered Home </strong>— This team has developed a smart breaker box that automatically senses, interprets and acts on electrical use information. The team says the box can help homeowners save an estimated 25 percent on energy bills while enjoying a more responsive and convenient smart home, and will help utility companies smooth demand, respond to events, make predictions and streamline operational costs and complexity. <br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:<br/></p><ul><li>Will Blanchard, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering and bachelor’s in applied science in systems engineering;<br/></li><li>Allen Nikka, who earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 2017 and is earning a master’s in computer science in 2018;<br/></li><li>Brennan Morell, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in computer science;<br/></li><li>Danny Andreev, who is expected to earn a bachelor’s and master’s in electrical engineering and a bachelor’s degree in computer science in 2020.<br/></li><li><a href="/news/Documents/EDC%20Intro%20Slides%20CyberPowered%20Home-2.pdf">View company profile (.pdf)</a><br/></li></ul><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>OpCoderAI </strong>—<strong> </strong>This team has developed a software tool that streamlines the health-care billing and reimbursement process using artificial intelligence and natural language processing. By working as both a supplement to human coders and an auditing tool for hospital administrators, OpCoder AI seeks to revolutionize the efficiency and accuracy of the hospital reimbursement process.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:</p><ul><li>Peter Delaney, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in global health & environment;<br/></li><li>Will Luer, who is expected to graduate in May with a master’s in engineering in computer science & engineering and earned a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering in 2017;<br/></li><li>Adith Boloor, who earned a master’s in engineering in robotics in December 2017.<br/></li></ul><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>Stocksights</strong> — This team has developed an automated and interpretable investment analysis platform to help everyday investors make smarter investment decisions. By taking advantage of recent developments in commission-free trading and advances in computational power, the team brings many of the portfolio optimization techniques that were previously limited to professional asset managers to self-directed investors, ultimately providing consumers with fully personalized and meaningful investment guidance.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:</p><ul><li>Jon Gross, who earned a bachelor’s in systems science & engineering in 2016 and is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in applied science – mechanical engineering and a master’s in engineering data analytics & statistics;<br/></li><li>Anton Salem, a sophomore majoring in systems science & engineering;<br/></li></ul><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>UKnit</strong> — This team has developed a 3-D printer for clothing that allows small companies to sample designs in-house and to scale to meet demand.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:<br/></p><ul><li>Andrew O’Sullivan, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering;<br/></li><li>Sam Fortmann, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering;<br/></li><li>Daniel Martin, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering and a master’s in aerospace engineering.<br/></li></ul><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>With the goal of promoting new and innovative discoveries to solve challenges or needs, the School of Engineering & Applied Science created the Discovery Competition in 2012. 2018-04-23T05:00:00ZWith the goal of promoting new and innovative discoveries to solve challenges or needs, the School of Engineering & Applied Science created the Discovery Competition in 2012. The 2018 teams are: CyberPowered Home, OpCoderAI, Stocksights and UKnit.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Using-tooth-sensors-to-detect-disease.aspx854Using tooth sensors to detect disease<div class="div.youtube-wrap"><div class="iframe-container"> <iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tFs_3OWuG3k"></iframe> <br/><br/></div></div><div> <br/> </div>An interdisciplinary team of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the School of Engineering & Applied Science is redefining the notion of a wisdom tooth. <br/><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20Engineering%20electronic%20tooth%20sensor.png?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>​The team is developing a smart-tooth technology that could someday be used to detect early signs of certain diseases in high-risk patients by analyzing saliva or gingival crevicular fluid.</p><p>“Salivary-based biosensors have generated a lot of interest because of their potential for wide applications in medicine,” said Erica Lynn Scheller, who trained as a dentist and is now an assistant professor of medicine and of cell biology and physiology in the School of Medicine. “We’re initially working to develop a biological sensor that measures specific peptides active in periodontal disease and that would be used in combination with a wireless device to retrieve that data.”</p><p>“It’s like an electronic tooth,” said Shantanu Chakrabartty, professor of electrical & systems engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science and a partner on the project, currently funded by a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.</p><p>That electronic tooth is actually a tiny sensor and an electronic chip, about a few millimeters-cube in volume. It is designed to be inserted inside the patient’s gum line or as part of a dental appliance, and contains bio-recognition elements that measure disease-specific peptides, which are natural or synthetic groups of amino acids. As a first attempt, the research team will work toward monitoring peptides related to bone breakdown during periodontitis, a dental disease that can lead to loosening and loss of teeth. A wireless ultrasound device would then be used to read the peptide levels and connect to the medical data-cloud.</p><p>Right now, one of the project’s biggest challenges is chemistry.</p><p>“You only have a finite number of of bio-recognition elements conjugated to the transducer if you are using an antibody that is specific to these peptides,” said Srikanth Singamaneni, associate professor of mechanical engineering & materials science. “They get saturated fairly quickly. The question is how do you refresh those sensors? That’s one of the aspects we are working to address with this project.”</p><p>The research team says developing a new, minimally invasive system that can detect and monitor gum disease and the effectiveness of treatment would be beneficial to the 64 million U.S. residents with periodontal disease and to their dentists. The researchers also are interested in developing other applications for the technology that, while likely years away, could go well beyond the dentist’s chair.</p><p>“We’re developing this sensing platform that can be expanded to include additional tracking for inflammatory markers, stress markers and diabetes monitoring,” Scheller said. “Really, anything you can think of that you’d want to track in the oral cavity, we’re developing both the platform and the specific application.”</p><hr style="height: 1px; background-color: #c8c8c8; border-top-width: 0px; margin-bottom: 1.5em; caret-color: #3c3d3d; color: #3c3d3d; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 19.2px;"/><p><strong>This study is supported by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01DE027098.</strong><br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p><br/><br/> ​<br/><br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>​Collabo​rators​<br/></h3><div> <strong><br/> </strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Singamaneni_Srikanth.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px; width: 120px; height: 120px;"/></a>​​</strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx"><strong>​Srikanth Singamaneni</strong></a></strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Associate Professor</span></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">​Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science</span> </div><div> <br/> </div><div><div style="color: #343434; line-height: 20.8px; text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Shantanu-Chakrabartty.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Chakrabartty_Shantanu.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a>​​<br/><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Shantanu-Chakrabartty.aspx"><strong>Shantanu Chakrabartty</strong></a></strong> </div><div style="color: #343434; line-height: 20.8px; text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Professo​r</span> </div><div style="color: #343434; line-height: 20.8px; text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Electrical & Systems Engineering</span><span style="font-size: 1em;">​</span></div></div><div style="color: #343434; line-height: 20.8px; text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 1em;"><br/></span></div> ​​<br/> <div style="caret-color: #343434; color: #343434; line-height: 20.8px; text-align: center;"> <a href="https://diabetesresearchcenter.dom.wustl.edu/erica-l-scheller-dds-phd/"><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Scheller_E.jpg?RenditionID=3" rtenodeid="4" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a><br rtenodeid="5"/><a href="https://diabetesresearchcenter.dom.wustl.edu/erica-l-scheller-dds-phd/" rtenodeid="2"><strong>Erica Lynn Scheller</strong></a><br rtenodeid="10"/><strong>DDS, PhD</strong><br/></div><div style="caret-color: #343434; color: #343434; line-height: 20.8px; text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Assistant Professo​r of Medicine</span></div></div>Erika Ebsworth-Goold https://source.wustl.edu/2018/04/using-tooth-sensors-to-detect-disease/2018-04-19T05:00:00ZAn interdisciplinary team of researchers from the School of Medicine and the School of Engineering & Applied Science is redefining the notion of a wisdom tooth. The team is developing technology that could someday be used to detect early signs of disease.<p>​Collaborative research team developing biological sensors that would analyze saliva, send information electronically to doctors<br/></p>Y
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Meet-the-Class-of-2018-Valedictorians.aspx853Meet the Class of 2018 Valedictorians<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/_72O9324.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p> <strong>​Jessi Gray</strong> will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in computer science with a minor in math. After graduation, she plans to return to her native Boston for the summer for a much-needed break, then work in the tech field for a couple of years before pursuing a master’s degree.<br/></p><p> <strong>Sydney Katz</strong> will graduate with bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering and applied science (systems science & engineering) with a minor in applied microeconomics. She will begin graduate school in aerospace engineering at Stanford University next fall.<br/></p><p> <strong>Nikhil Patel</strong> will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering with a minor in bioinformatics. He will remain at WashU for another year earning a master’s in computer science while applying to medical school.<br/></p><p> <strong>Vanessa Wu</strong> will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering with a second major in economic strategy and a minor in energy engineering. After graduating, she will begin working with Boston Consulting Group in Dallas.<br/></p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Jessi%20Gray.JPG?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Jessi Gray<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>What is your advice to future WashU students? </strong>My advice to future WashU students is to make sure to explore the school beyond its academic components. Don’t just go to school, go to college! I learned a lot more outside the classroom than I did inside. Only this semester did I really start taking full advantage of being surrounded by so many people with different backgrounds and interests. I’ve been trying to get more involved in things I’m passionate about, to make new friends and to start more conversations with strangers. There are so many different people here – all with their own stories – that you can learn from and relate to. But that can only happen once you step outside the classroom, outside your comfort zone, and into the world.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>How have you changed during your time at WashU? </strong>I've accepted and learned to love who I am: a transgender woman (and so much more). I applied to WashU lying to both myself and to the world about who I was. Then, while studying abroad in New Zealand, I realized I couldn't keep ignoring who I was. I needed to start living openly and honestly. I slowly started transitioning over the summer and then began my senior year living a double life. Each day I put on a mask and costume to go to campus and only a select group of people knew who I really was.</p><blockquote>Thankfully, this past semester (my final one at WashU) has been my best one yet.</blockquote> I'm living life outside of the closet, and, though I've lost some friends, I’ve gotten closer with others and made many new ones. Most importantly, I'm happier than I ever imagined was possible and have learned more about life in the past year than I had in the 21 years before it. <div><p> <br/> </p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Sydney_0165.JPG?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Sydney Katz<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>What is something you know now that you wish you had known on your first day at WashU?</strong></p><p></p><blockquote>I wish I had known about the engineering tutor program earlier. It is a great way to get some extra help in a class from somebody who has taken it before, and it is free for all engineering students!</blockquote><p> <strong>What was one piece of advice you got as a student that has stuck with you? </strong>During a talk given by the center director at one of my internships, he said, “You know you’re a leader when there is a problem and everyone in the room looks at you.” I think that this is a really cool way to look at leadership, and it has shaped the way that I try to make an impact in the various groups I am involved with.<br/> </p><p> <strong>What makes you want to be an engineer? </strong>I have always loved working with others to solve challenging problems, and there is certainly no shortage of hard problems in engineering. Engineers get to work on the big stuff like sending spacecraft to Mars or creating cars that drive by themselves, and they do so in extremely collaborative teams. It is the perfect fit for me!<br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Nikhil%20Patel.jpg?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Nikhil Patel<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong></strong> <strong>What is something you know now that you wish you had known on your first day at WashU?</strong></p><blockquote>Collaboration is the only way to make it through engineering here. </blockquote><p>Getting together with a group of people to work through a problem set is always more fun than doing it on your own (even if it takes little bit longer).</p><p> <strong>Which professors would you recommend new students get to know? </strong>Professor Widder!!! I have spent more time in her lab than in any other room in an engineering building as a student, TA, or just as a work place. She’s an incredible teacher but is also a delight to chat with.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>What is one thing from your time as a WashU engineering student that you will take with you in your next step? </strong>I will never forget the frog dissections I did in QP (Quantitative Physiology) lab because they made me feel like a surgeon! It’s ironic to me that my favorite engineering class is actually one that has motivated me to go to medical school.<br/></p> <br/> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"> <br/> </p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Vanessa%20Wu.jpg?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Vanessa Wu<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>Where was your favorite place to study at WashU? </strong>Third floor of Green Hall! There are two big round tables there, and the area is bright, spacious, and quiet. The close proximity to Kayaks and Forest Park is also a huge plus in case I need study breaks.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>Was there a class that you started out not liking or were struggling in that turned out to be one of your favorite classes or most valuable?</strong> Conflict Management and Negotiation. The only reason this class got on my radar was because it was required, and even then, I waited until my last semester to take it. I expected a lot of reading and writing (at least by Engineering standards), but I didn’t expect how practical and applicable it could be. Working through a negotiation simulation and understanding different conflict management approaches were such valuable experiences.</p><blockquote> Ultimately, what you get out of these type of classes really depends on how much you put in.<br/></blockquote> <p> <strong>What is one thing from your time as a WashU engineering student that you will take with you in your next step? </strong>Being a WashU engineering student and balancing academic with extracurricular activities and other pursuits is not easy. I have definitely felt overwhelmed and have thought about settling and just being “good enough.” However, nothing comes easy. The only way to learn is to keep challenging and pushing ourselves.<br/></p></div>2017 Commencement Speaker Greg Hyslop, chief technology officer of The Boeing Co.2018-04-18T05:00:00Z​Jessi Gray, Sydney Katz, Nikhil Patel and Vanessa Wu will speak at the 2018 Engineering Recognition Ceremony on May 17.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Guertler-Kavadiya-receive-Association-of-Women-Faculty-Graduate-Student-Awards.aspx849Guertler, Kavadiya receive Association of Women Faculty Graduate Student Awards<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/brookings.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Charlotte Guertler, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering & materials science, and Shalinee Kavadiya, a doctoral student in energy, environmental & chemical engineering, have been selected to receive a 2018 Association of Women Faculty Graduate Student Award. The awards recognize academic excellence and leadership potential among women students in the second year of graduate school or beyond. Each will receive her award May 1.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Guertler is a student in the lab of Philip Bayly, chair and the Lilyan & E. Lisle Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Kavadiya is a student in the lab of Pratim Biswas, chair and the Lucy and Stanley Lopata Professor of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering.<br/></p>2018-04-16T05:00:00Z

​​​

Newsletters