https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Alum-astronaut-makes-history.aspx1332Alum astronaut makes history<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/sp-2019-10-2555-ksc_ccp_crew_awareness_poster_spacex_2-jpg1-1200x600.jpg?RenditionID=12" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​“What do ballplayers, rock stars and presidents want to be when they grow up?”</p><p>Col. Robert “Bob” Behnken, BSME ’92 (mechanical engineering), BSPhy ’92 (physics), wears a serious expression on his face when he rhetorically asks the question during an interview about his education at Washington University in St. Louis.</p><p>The uniform he wears pretty much gives the answer away, but it’s the quick smile he flashes that lets you know he means it.</p><p>“Astronaut.”</p><p>At 3:22 p.m. EST on Saturday, May 30, Behnken and fellow astronaut Col. Doug Hurley became the first astronauts to head to space from U.S. soil since 2011, when NASA’s Space Shuttle program ended. And they were the first in NASA’s history to launch from a commercially built and operated spacecraft: the SpaceX Crew Dragon.</p><p>“Launch Day. In America. Again,” Behnken tweeted just after 8:45 a.m. Saturday.<br/></p><div><div class="iframe-container"> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l-FJiMY9XuA" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe>          </div> <br/></div><p>The importance of bringing launches back to America is something the St. Ann, Missouri, native has been vocal about. “After having grown up with the shuttle program — seeing the launches and the crowds on the Florida coast — and being a child inspired by NASA’s plans for future exploration, I think it’s important for the U.S. to continue to have these exciting missions out there,” Behnken said in an interview prior to the launch.</p><p>“It motivated me to go into this sort of career, and I know that it motivates other children.”</p><p>He knows because he talks to them. From elementary school kids to college students, Behnken seems as comfortable in front of a classroom as in the cockpit of a space-bound vessel, which, to be clear, for him is very comfortable.</p><p>“Every time he comes back, he gives a talk,” says Philip Bayly, the Lilyan & E. Lisle Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering and chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Material Sciences at the McKelvey School of Engineering. “[Bob] speaks to students and to alumni. He is very popular as a speaker and a guest.</p><p>“He’s such a personable guy,” Bayly says, “and a great story.”</p><p>He wasn’t too bad as a student, either. Behnken was an Air Force ROTC scholar and, in 1992, he was the university’s Outstanding Mechanical Engineering Senior. His double major in mechanical engineering and physics (at the time, the engineering school awarded the physics degree) prepared him for a hands-on future working with some of the most powerful machines on the planet.</p><p>He learned about some of the most fragile, too.</p><p>About 30 years ago, Behnken took a course focused on the physics of cardiovascular physiology with James G. Miller, the Albert Gordon Hill Professor of Physics Emeritus. The lectures and discussions covered the effects on the heart of accelerating significantly faster than gravity, including blackouts and redouts (when strong acceleration forces blood to pool in the head).</p><p>“However,” Miller says, “at the time, neither Bob Behnken nor I could have anticipated the substantial cardiovascular effects associated with long duration shuttle flights in zero-g.” (A 2007 NASA study on board the International Space Station — called the <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/cciss_feature.html">Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS</a> — examined how long-duration exposure to microgravity affected crew members, specifically their heart functions, blood pressure and blood vessels that supply the brain.)</p><p>Accepting those kinds of unknowns is a hallmark of Behnken’s career. Soon after college, he would get a small taste of those high gs he learned about in Miller’s class.</p> <figure class="wp-caption alignright" style="box-sizing: inherit; display: inline; margin: 0px 0px 1.5em 1.5em; float: right; max-width: 100%; padding: 0px; border: none; background-image: none; caret-color: #3c3d3d; color: #3c3d3d; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 19.2px; width: 225px;"><img data-attachment-id="399125" data-permalink="https://source.wustl.edu/2020/06/alum-astronaut-makes-history/cca_bob_behnken/" data-orig-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/cca_bob_behnken.jpg" data-orig-size="1041,1388" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"6.8","credit":"Robert Markowitz - NASA - Johnso","camera":"Hasselblad H6D-100c","caption":"Official NASA\/Commercial Crew Portrait - Robert \"Bob\" Behnken. Photo Date: July 27, 2018. Location: Building 8, Room 183 - Photo Studio. Photographer: Robert Markowitz","created_timestamp":"1480347778","copyright":"Robert Markowitz \/ NASA - Johnson Space Center","focal_length":"150","iso":"100","shutter_speed":"0.008","title":"","orientation":"1"}" data-image-title="cca_bob_behnken" data-image-description="<p>Washington University alumnus Col. Robert “Bob” Behnken, BSME ’92 (mechanical engineering), BSPhy ’92 (physics). (Official NASA/Commercial Crew portrait: Robert Markowitz)</p>" data-medium-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/cca_bob_behnken-225x300.jpg" data-large-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/cca_bob_behnken-768x1024.jpg" class="size-medium wp-image-399125" src="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/cca_bob_behnken-225x300.jpg" alt="Washington University alumnus Col. Robert “Bob” Behnken, BSME ’92 (mechanical engineering), BSPhy ’92 (physics). (Official NASA/Commercial Crew portrait: Robert Markowitz)" style="box-sizing: inherit; border-width: 0px; width: 225px; display: block; margin: 5px;"/><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin-bottom: 0px; font-size: 1rem; font-style: italic; line-height: 1.333; color: #626464; margin-top: 0.25em;">Washington University alumnus Col. Robert “Bob” Behnken, BSME ’92 (mechanical engineering), BSPhy ’92 (physics). (Official NASA/Commercial Crew portrait: Robert Markowitz)</figcaption></figure> <p>After earning a master’s degree and doctorate in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, Behnken went on to the Air Force where he worked as a test pilot. He was the lead test engineer for the fourth-generation F-22, a jet that can subject its pilot to almost 10 times the acceleration of gravity.</p><p>“I thought that flying was better than sitting behind an engineer’s desk,” he said in an earlier interview in this magazine.</p><p>In 2000, Behnken was selected by NASA into its astronaut candidate training program. He flew on two Space Shuttle missions, STS-123 Endeavour in 2008 and STS-130 Endeavor in 2010. After racking up more than 700 hours in space, including 37 hours on space walks, he served as NASA’s chief astronaut from July 2012 to July 2015.</p><p>Once again, Behnken finds himself as a test pilot; officially, he is the joint operations mission commander for NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission. Even though he’s now working with SpaceX, he says his Air Force experience continues to serve him well.</p><p>In the Air Force, he says, he was balancing managing risk while collecting data, “in a calm, cool test environment with experienced folks.” Although this mission is, as he says, “a little more complicated with a lot less resources,” his role remains the same.</p><p>He and Hurley are conducting multiple tests to ensure SpaceX’s systems are safe and efficient for future human space travel. The initial launch date, May 27, had to be scrubbed — postponed due to weather conditions. (WashU alumnus <a href="https://www.wfmz.com/news/area/pennsylvania/former-wfmz-weatherman-and-current-launch-weather-officer-brian-cizek-discusses-upcoming-spacex-launch/article_06b2ad0e-9cf3-11ea-a16b-6f5c35b94755.html">Brian Cizek, </a>AB ’15, also participated in the historic launch serving as a launch weather officer for the U.S. Air Force.) Despite the hours of preparation and goodbyes to family, Behnken took it in stride, pointing out on <a href="https://twitter.com/AstroBehnken/status/1266481275977846790">Twitter</a> that it was still a first:</p><p>Wednesday’s scrub accomplished something new, fueling and de-fueling of a <a href="https://twitter.com/SpaceX">@SpaceX</a> Falcon9 w/humans onboard. Fitting that our test flight checked that off the list of firsts before Crew1 (<a href="https://twitter.com/Astro_illini">@Astro_illini</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/VicGlover">@VicGlover</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/Astro_Soichi">@Astro_Soichi</a>, and Shannon Walker) climb into their vehicle!</p><p>Saturday afternoon brought another round of goodbyes and final preparations.</p><p>At the top of the 127-foot Falcon launcher sat Crew Dragon. Inside, seated about halfway up the 27-foot Crew Dragon were Behnken and Hurley — or Bob and Doug, as they are called. This time, the weather cooperated, and the two launched successfully and headed out on a 19-hour voyage to the International Space Station (ISS).</p><p>On the ground, the astronauts’ families — both Behnken and Hurley are married to astronauts — took part in a ritual few family members ever will: watching their loved ones shoot into space. Nerve-racking? Maybe. But it was a moment Behnken says he has been waiting for.</p><p>“On a deeply personal level, I’m really excited that my son is going to get a chance to get to see me launch into space.” Until the launch, Behnken says, being an astronaut had been “a bit of an abstraction” for his son, who was born after Behnken’s final Shuttle mission.</p><div class="tiled-gallery type-square" data-original-width="656" data-carousel-extra="{"blog_id":1,"permalink":"https:\/\/source.wustl.edu\/2020\/06\/alum-astronaut-makes-history\/","likes_blog_id":104347276}" style="box-sizing: inherit; cursor: pointer; clear: both; margin: 0px 0px 20px; overflow: hidden; caret-color: #3c3d3d; color: #3c3d3d; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 19.2px;"><div class="gallery-row" data-original-width="656" data-original-height="328" style="box-sizing: inherit; overflow: hidden; width: 656px; height: 328px;"><div class="gallery-group" data-original-width="328" data-original-height="328" style="box-sizing: inherit; float: left; width: 328px; height: 328px;"><div class="tiled-gallery-item " style="box-sizing: inherit; float: left; margin: 0px; width: inherit;"> <a href="https://source.wustl.edu/2020/06/alum-astronaut-makes-history/crew-dragon-liftoff/" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: inherit; border: none; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-decoration: none; width: auto;"><img data-attachment-id="399152" data-orig-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-Liftoff.jpg" data-orig-size="2048,1414" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"0","credit":"(NASA\/Joel Kowsky)","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"(NASA\/Joel Kowsky)rrFor copyright and restrictions refer to -\u00a0http:\/\/www.nasa.gov\/multimedia\/guidelines\/index.html","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}" data-image-title="Crew Dragon Liftoff" data-image-description="<p>On Saturday, May 30, 2020, a SpaceX Falcon9 rocket carrying the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft is launched, carrying astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station. (Courtesy of NASA)</p> " data-medium-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-Liftoff-300x207.jpg" data-large-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-Liftoff-1024x707.jpg" src="https://i1.wp.com/source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-Liftoff.jpg?w=324&h=324&crop=1&ssl=1" width="324" data-original-width="324" data-original-height="324" title="Crew Dragon Liftoff" alt="On Saturday, May 30, 2020, a SpaceX Falcon9 rocket carrying the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft is launched, carrying astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station. (Courtesy of NASA)" height="324" style="box-sizing: inherit; width: 324px; background-image: none; box-shadow: none; vertical-align: middle; object-fit: cover; margin: 5px; height: 324px;"/></a></div></div><div class="gallery-group" data-original-width="328" data-original-height="328" style="box-sizing: inherit; float: left; width: 328px; height: 328px;"><div class="tiled-gallery-item " style="box-sizing: inherit; float: left; margin: 0px; width: inherit;"> <a href="https://source.wustl.edu/2020/06/alum-astronaut-makes-history/crew-dragon-docking/" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: inherit; border: none; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-decoration: none; width: auto;"><img data-attachment-id="399140" data-orig-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-docking.jpg" data-orig-size="1200,674" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"11","credit":"","camera":"NIKON D4","caption":"","created_timestamp":"1590934332","copyright":"","focal_length":"135","iso":"1000","shutter_speed":"0.002","title":"","orientation":"1"}" data-image-title="Crew Dragon docking" data-image-description="<p>The SpaceX Crew Dragon approaches the International Space Station. (Courtesy of NASA)</p> " data-medium-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-docking-300x169.jpg" data-large-file="https://source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-docking-1024x575.jpg" src="https://i0.wp.com/source.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Crew-Dragon-docking.jpg?w=324&h=324&crop=1&ssl=1" width="324" data-original-width="324" data-original-height="324" title="Crew Dragon docking" alt="The SpaceX Crew Dragon approaches the International Space Station. (Courtesy of NASA)" height="324" style="box-sizing: inherit; width: 324px; background-image: none; box-shadow: none; vertical-align: middle; object-fit: cover; margin: 5px; height: 324px;"/></a></div></div></div></div><p>Nearly 19 hours after launch, Sunday. May 31 at 10:16 a.m. EST, Crew Dragon docked, automatically, with the ISS. Behnken and Hurley floated aboard and were welcomed with hugs, a gesture still safe in space if not back here on Earth. The two joined NASA Commander Chris Cassidy, who has been on orbit since April 9, and Roscosmos cosmonauts, Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner.</p><p>The Demo-2 mission is somewhat open-ended. This test-ready Crew Dragon can stay in orbit for about 110 days, but the mission duration is yet to be determined. Such unknowns are unusual for a space mission.</p><p>But not for Behnken.</p><p>“He embraces risk and adventure,” Bayly says. “I think if there weren’t any, he’d be bored.”</p><p>“Bob Behnken is the kind of alum that every engineering dean loves to describe when trying to engage students,” says Aaron Bobick, dean of the McKelvey School of Engineering and the James M. McKelvey Professor. “He combined science and engineering in both his undergraduate and graduate studies, went on to achieve great success in a field that captures the imagination, and has used that success to inspire others to pursue their dreams.”<br/></p>Brandie Jeffersonhttps://source.wustl.edu/2020/06/alum-astronaut-makes-history/2020-06-16T05:00:00Z​On May 30, 2020, WashU alumnus Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley became the first astronauts in NASA’s history to launch from a commercially built and operated spacecraft, the SpaceX Crew Dragon.<p>​On May 30, 2020, WashU alumnus Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley became the first astronauts in NASA’s history to launch from a commercially built and operated spacecraft, the SpaceX Crew Dragon. For the Demo-2 mission, the two are testing the spacecraft’s transportation system for future missions.<br/></p>Y
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Guan-to-serve-on-NIH-Biomaterials-and-Biointerfaces-Study-Section.aspx1323Guan to serve on NIH Biomaterials and Biointerfaces Study Section<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jianjun%20Guan%202018.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​</p><p>Jianjun Guan, professor of mechanical engineering & materials science, has been selected to serve as a member of the Biomaterials and Biointerfaces Study Section of the National Institutes of Health's Center for Scientific Review for a four-year term beginning July 1.</p><p> </p><p>Guan was nominated for the role because of his demonstrated competence and achievement in his scientific discipline as shown by the quality of his accomplishments in research, publications in scientific journals and other scientific activities.</p><p> </p><p>In the role, Guan will review grant applications submitted to the NIH, make recommendations on the applications and survey the status of research in his field.</p><p> </p><p>Guan's research is in biomimetic biomaterials synthesis and scaffold fabrication; bioinspired modification of biomaterials; injectable and highly flexible hydrogels; bioimageable polymers for MRI and EPR imaging and oxygen sensing; mathematical modeling of scaffold structural and mechanical properties; stem cell differentiation; neural stem cell transplantation for brain tissue regeneration; bone tissue engineering and cardiovascular tissue engineering.</p><p> </p><p><br/></p>2020-05-28T05:00:00ZJianjun Guan will serve on the Biomaterials and Biointerfaces Study Section of the National Institutes of Health's Center for Scientific Review.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-engineers,-collaborators-make-new-2D-alloys-designed-on-supercomputers.aspx1320WashU engineers, collaborators make new 2D alloys designed on supercomputers<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Mishra-research-05.2020.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p style="text-align: left;">​Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) have predicted and synthesized new 2D alloys with catalytic properties that can be used in lithium-air (Li-air) batteries and to reduce carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2</sub>), a greenhouse gas.</p><p style="text-align: left;">In research published May 25, 2020, in <em>Advanced Materials</em>, Rohan Mishra, assistant professor of mechanical engineering & materials science in the McKelvey School of Engineering at WashU, and John Cavin, a physics doctoral student in his lab, used quantum-mechanical calculations and thermodynamics to make predictions on the stability of 25 alloys of a class of materials known as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) that can be separated into atomically thin 2D layers. Two-dimensional materials are of interest for nanoelectronics because of their exceptional electronic and optical properties and for catalysis because of their large surface area. These predictions were then sent to collaborators at UIC, led by Amin Salehi-Khojin, who synthesized a subset of 12 alloys in the lab and confirmed all of them to match with Cavin's predictions.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">Individual TMDCs have been found to be good catalysts to facilitate various chemical reactions that are important in Li-air batteries, fuel cells and for CO<sub>2</sub> reduction. These three applications are important to reduce dependence on and to reverse the damage done by fossil fuel use, Cavin said.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">"Catalysts can help separate oxygen molecules that are made up of a pair of oxygen atoms to individual atoms, then combine that with hydrogen to get water and energy in fuel-cell-powered cars, which currently use expensive metals like platinum as a catalyst," Cavin said.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">Similar oxygen reduction reaction takes place in Li-air batteries, high energy density batteries that are great for electric cars, Cavin said.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">While catalysts are needed in fuel cells and batteries to maximize energy extraction, Mishra said, "catalysts are needed to help recycle the greenhouse gas CO<sub>2</sub> back to fuels without spending too much energy."<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">Alloying has been shown to improve catalytic behavior in other classes of materials but has had limited applications in TMDCs.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">"These alloys have not been largely explored because of a lack in understanding of their stability under relevant growth conditions," Mishra said.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">Alloying is the process of mixing two materials with different properties to get a material that shows a combination of the properties or even new ones. However, not all materials are receptive to mixing. A classic example is water and oil, which separate when mixed because of the way their molecules interact. Similarly, some alloys are prone to separation due to the way their atoms interact.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">Alloys that mix easily are referred to as miscible, Mishra said. Because the benefits of alloying are reduced through separation, having the ability to determine the miscibility of an alloy is valuable. Using considerable supercomputing resources, made available by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) network, which is supported by the National Science Foundation, Cavin calculated the miscibility of 25 TMDC alloys. Of those, nine were predicted to be miscible including four that had not been synthesized before.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">The group at WashU also showed that increased growth temperatures could be used to mix some immiscible TMDC alloys. The second law of thermodynamics says that entropy, a measure of disorder, likes to increase. At higher temperatures, this effect is amplified and the high chemical disorder in a well-mixed alloy is preferred over the low disorder of a segregated alloy. Using these thermodynamic principles, the WashU group was able to determine the temperature required for mixing the remaining 16 immiscible TMDC alloys.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">The team from UIC synthesized 12 of the predicted alloys using a scalable chemical vapor transport method. They performed characterization of the structure and composition of the materials from macroscopic to atomic scales using a suite of techniques, all of which confirmed Cavin's predictions.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">In addition to their synthesis and characterization work, the team from UIC also tested the catalytic performance of one of the miscible alloys for CO<sub>2</sub> reduction and for oxygen reduction in Li-air battery setups.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">"Our colleagues characterized the properties, and found that an alloy of Niobium disulfide and Tantalum disulfide was excellent for CO<sub>2</sub> reduction and for oxygen reduction," Mishra said.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">Going forward, the researchers plan to explore other emergent properties of these alloys, including superconductivity, magnetism and topological insulation. Mishra has filed a provisional patent for the process/alloys with assistance from Washington University's Office of Technology Management.<br/></p><p style="text-align: left;">The work stems from a $361,177 <a href="/news/Pages/WashU-engineer-seeks-new-catalysts-from-2-D-materials.aspx">grant</a> from the National Science Foundation as part of the Materials Genome Initiative launched by President Barack Obama in 2011 as a multi-agency initiative to create policy, resources and infrastructure that support U.S. institutions to discover, manufacture and deploy advanced materials efficiently and cost-effectively. It builds on <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.201804453">work published</a> in <em>Advanced Materials</em> in 2018 in which the groups looked at the catalytic activity of individual pure TMDCs.</p><p style="text-align: left;">"That was the motivation for us to do this," Mishra said. "Some showed good properties in one reaction and one for the other, and we wondered if we could mix them together to improve overall performance."<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p style="text-align: justify;">Hemmat Z, Cavin J, Ahmadiparidari A, Ruckel A, Rastegar S, Misal SN, Majidi L, Kumar K, Wang S, Guo J, Dawood R, Lagunas F, Parajuli P, Ngo AT, Curtiss LA, Cho SB, Cabana J, Klie RF, Mishra R, Salehi-Khojin A. Quasi-Binary Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Alloys: Thermodynamic Stability Prediction, Scalable Synthesis and Application. <em>Advanced Materials</em>. May 25, 2020. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201907041" style="background-color: #ffffff;">https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201907041</a>.<br/></p><p>Funding for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation (DMREF Grant 1729420; 1800357; DMREF-1729787); and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office.
<br/></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><br/></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><br/></p><div> <br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Rohan Mishra<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Mishra_Rohan_03.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a><br/> </strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"><ul style="text-align: left;"><li> <span style="font-size: 1em;">Assistant Professor</span><br/></li><li> <span style="font-size: 1em;">Expertise: Rational design of materials for energy applications, atomic-scale modeling, electronic structure calculations, electron microscopy</span><br/></li></ul><p> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Rohan-Mishra.aspx" style="font-size: 1em; outline: 0px;">View Bio</a><br/></p></div></div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>John Cavin<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/WashU-engineers,-collaborators-make-new-2D-alloys-designed-on-supercomputers/John%20Cavin.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/> <br/><strong></strong></strong></div><div style="text-align: center;"><ul style="text-align: left;"><li>Doctoral Student in Physics<br/></li></ul></div></div></div>New alloys developed by a McKelvey Engineering and UIC team could be used in electric-car batteries and to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2).2020-05-26T05:00:00ZMcKelvey Engineering, UIC team create new ​2D alloys that could have applications for lithium-air batteries, recycling carbon dioxide into fuels<p>​Alloys could have applications for lithium-air batteries, recycling carbon dioxide into fuels<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Four-new-faculty-to-join-McKelvey-Engineering-in-2020-21.aspx1305New faculty to join McKelvey Engineering in 2020-21<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/new%20faculty%20202021%20summer.jpg?RenditionID=12" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>Four new tenure-track faculty members and one lecturer will join the McKelvey School of Engineering in the 2020-21 academic year, strengthening and expanding the breadth of research conducted in the school.<br/></p><p> <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Biomedical Engineering</strong></span></p><p> <strong>Alexandra L. Rutz, assistant professor<img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Alex%20Rutz.jpg?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></strong></p><ul><li>PhD, MS, biomedical engineering, Northwestern University</li><li>BS, chemistry and molecular and cellular biology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign<br/></li></ul><p>Alexandra L. Rutz joins McKelvey Engineering from the University of Cambridge, where she is the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Research Fellow in the bioelectronics lab of George Malliaras, the Prince Philip Professor of Technology.<br/></p><p>Rutz's research focuses on improving the biocompatibility and long-term function of implantable bioelectronics, especially neural probes. Her doctoral thesis focused on engineering hydrogel bioinks for 3D printing tissues and organs. Her training has been supported by grants from the Whitaker International Scholars Program, the NSF GRFP and the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship program. Rutz will join the department in Spring 2021.<br/></p> <span><hr/></span> <p> <strong>Ismael Seáñez, assistant professor<img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/IsmaelSeanezPhoto.jpg?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></strong></p><ul><li>PhD, MS, biomedical engineering, Northwestern University</li><li>BS, mechanical engineering, University of Texas, San Antonio<br/></li></ul><p>Ismael "Mayo" Seáñez joins McKelvey Engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EFPL), where he is a postdoctoral fellow working with Grégoire Courtine as head of the translational division at the NeuroRestore Defitech Center for Interventional Neurotherapies. In his work, Seáñez focuses on developing brain-spine interfaces where real-time brain recordings are used to reinforce leg movements with spinal cord stimulation. His training has been supported by grants from the Whitaker International Scholars Program, the National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship Program, the National Institutes of Health Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award and the NIH MARC program.</p><p> Seáñez will join the department in Spring 2021. He also will have a secondary appointment at the School of Medicine as assistant professor of neurosurgery. <br/></p><span><hr style="border-top-width: 1px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-color: #9e0918;"/></span> <p> <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Computer Science & Engineering </strong></span></p><p> <strong>James Orr, lecturer</strong></p><p></p><ul><li>PhD, computer science & engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, 2019<br/></li><li>BS, mathematics and computer science, Mississippi College, 2013</li></ul> <strong></strong> <p></p><p>James Orr joins CSE as a lecturer. He is a postdoctoral research associate in the department, working in the lab of Sanjoy Baruah, professor. While a doctoral student, Orr was a research assistant in the lab of Chris Gill, professor of computer science. He co-taught Advanced Operating Systems in CSE With Gill in Fall 2016 and has been a guest lecturer in four CSE courses. He has been a reviewer for IEEE Transactions on Computers and for ACM Transactions on Parallel Computing.<br/></p><span><hr style="border-top-width: 1px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-color: #9e0918;"/></span> <p> </p><p> <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Electrical & Systems Engineering</strong></span></p><p> <strong>Mark Lawrence, assistant professor<img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Mark%20Lawrence%20Head-shoulders.png?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></strong></p><ul><li>PhD, physics, University of Birmingham</li><li>MS, theoretical physics, University of Birmingham (England)<br/></li></ul><p>Mark Lawrence will join the Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering in January 2021 from Stanford University, where he is a postdoctoral researcher and physicist with interests in optics, nanophotonics and condensed matter physics. He is advised by Jennifer Dionne, associate professor of materials science and engineering who earned bachelor's degrees in physics and systems science & engineering from WashU in 2003. Lawrence's specific research focuses on the use of dielectric metasurfaces, plasmonic nanoantennas and photonic crystals to build novel systems and devices for applications in telecommunications, computing and quantum information.<br/></p><p>While at Stanford, Lawrence proposed and experimentally demonstrated the first high-quality factor phase gradient metasurfaces and theoretically demonstrated power independent subwavelength nonreciprocity using Raman amplification; subwavelength Kerr-nonlinear nonreciprocal beam-steering; and dielectric metasurface enhanced enantiomeric detection and separation of chiral molecules. He has been an author on 14 published papers and one book chapter and holds one patent and two provisional patents. </p> <span> <hr style="border-top-width: 1px; border-top-style: solid; border-top-color: #9e0918;"/></span> <p> <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science</strong></span></p><p> <strong>Sang-Hoon Bae, assistant professor<img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Sang-Hoon1.jpg?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></strong></p><ul><li>PhD, materials science and engineering, University of California, Los Angeles</li><li>MS, BS, materials science and engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (South Korea)<br/></li></ul><p>Sang-Hoon Bae will join the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science in August 2021 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is a postdoctoral research associate. His research interests include new material building blocks, including freestanding single-crystalline 3D thin films and 2D atomic layers; highly-efficient, cost-effective advanced photovoltaics; and heterogeneous integration with artificial intelligence toward ubiquitous electronics.<br/></p><p>He is an author on 47 published papers and has won numerous awards. Bae completed research internships at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center and Samsung Display.<br/></p> <SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>Beth Miller 2020-05-26T05:00:00ZFour new tenure-track faculty members and one lecturer will join the McKelvey School of Engineering in the 2020-21 academic year, strengthening and expanding the breadth of research conducted in the school.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/genin-paper-named-one-of-nature-communications-most-read-in-2019.aspx1330Genin paper named one of Nature Communications’ most read in 2019<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Genin_Guy.jpg?RenditionID=7" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​A paper by Guy Genin, the Harold and Kathleen Faught Professor of Mechanical Engineering, was recently named one of the most read Nature Communications physics articles in 2019.  </p>Genin’s paper, "Programmable and robust static topological solitons in mechanical metamaterials,” was published on Dec. 6, 2019.  <br/>Danielle Lacey2020-05-08T05:00:00ZGenin’s paper, "Programmable and robust static topological solitons in mechanical metamaterials,” was one of Nature Communications most read articles in 2019.

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