https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Agarwal-named-Honorary-Member-of-ASME.aspx658Agarwal named Honorary Member of ASME<p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Ramesh-Agarwal.aspx">​Ramesh Agarwal</a>, the William Palm Professor of Engineering in the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, has been elected an Honorary Member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).<br/></p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Agarwal_Ramesh.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Agarwal receives the honor, the highest given by ASME, “for pioneering high-impact research contributions to computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer; for innovative contributions to mechanical engineering education; and for meritorious service to the mechanical engineering profession,” the ASME wrote.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Agarwal will receive the honor at ASME’s Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition in November.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Agarwal is a Fellow of 18 societies and has received many honors and awards for his research contributions. He is the author and coauthor of more than 500 publications and serves on the editorial board of more than 20 journals. His research interests include flow control, rarefied gas dynamics and hypersonic flows, turbulence modeling, bio-fluid dynamics, energy from wind and biomass, carbon capture and sequestration, chemical looping combustion, and energy efficiency of buildings.<br/></p>Ramesh Agarwal2017-06-19T05:00:00Z​Ramesh Agarwal receives the highest honor given by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for "pioneering high-impact research contributions to computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer."
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Michael-Lagieski-Selected-for-NCAA-Postgraduate-Scholarship.aspx664Michael Lagieski selected for NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship<p>​<span style="font-size: 21px;">​</span><span aria-hidden="true" style="font-size: 21px;"></span><span style="font-size: 21px;">Washington University in St. Louis senior swimmer </span><a href="http://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/swimdive/2016-17/bios/lagieski_michael_e23j" style="background-color: #ffffff; font-size: 21px;">Michael Lagieski</a><span style="font-size: 21px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 21px;">was awarded the 2017 NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, an honor which is bestowed on student-athletes that excel both academically and athletically while also serving as leaders in the community.</span><br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20engineering%20Michael%20Lagieski.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Lagieski will receive a scholarship of $7,500 to be used for postgraduate study within three years. He will remain on the Danforth Campus while pursuing a master's degree in aerospace engineering at WashU.</p><p>"I was lucky enough to know what I wanted to do with my life before entering college," stated Lagieski. "I wanted to be an NCAA National Champion and an aerospace engineer. I never knew that both of these goals would become so entwined, let alone become a reality."</p><p>The mechanical engineering major concluded his undergraduate curriculum with a 3.74 grade point average while earning First Team Academic All-America honors by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). During his 2016-17 campaign he swam to six All-American finishes, including three individually. Lagieski set multiple personal best times at the 2017 NCAA Division III National Championship with a time of 1:58.51 in the 200 breaststroke (third) and 1:48.28 in the 200 individual medley (sixth).</p><blockquote>"None of this would be possible without the support of my fantastic coaches, professors, teammates, family and friends," added Lagieski. "They were the crazy ones who believed I could do it."</blockquote> <p>Lagieski swam to 15 All-American honors in his career, including the 2014 NCAA Division III 100 breaststroke National Championship winning time, 54.10, which set a then school record and national championship meet record. Also during the 2014 season, Lagieski was named the University Athletic Association (UAA) Swimmer of the Year and Rookie of the Year. </p><p>"I am incredibly grateful for the opportunities and experiences WashU has given me over the last four years," said the two-time College Swim Coaches of America Association (CSCAA) First Team Scholar All-America honoree, "and I am proud to continue to represent the Bears with the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship."<br/></p>Michael Lagieski bearsports.wustl.eduhttp://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/swimdive/2016-17/releases/20170616jwiphu2017-06-16T05:00:00Z
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Mishra-receives-Powe-Junior-Faculty-Award.aspx652Mishra receives Powe Junior Faculty Award<p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Rohan-Mishra.aspx">​Rohan Mishra</a>, assistant professor of mechanical engineering & materials science, has received a Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award from Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).<br/></p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Mishra_Rohan_03.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/News/34_.000">a</a></div><p>Mishra was one of 36 recipients from among 125 applicants of the one-year award, which provides seed money to junior faculty at ORAU-associated institutions. The award is designed to enrich the research and professional growth of young faculty and result in new funding opportunities.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>He is the fifth School of Engineering & Applied Science faculty member in 10 years to receive the award. Four associate professors in the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering have previously received the award: Young-Shin Jun in 2008; Yinjie Tang in 2010; John Fortner in 2012; and Fuzhong Zhang in 2013.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>With the award, Mishra, a materials scientist, plans to combine theoretical and experimental research to design stable, nontoxic, inorganic materials containing bismuth in a double-perovskite framework. The fastest-advancing absorber materials for solar cells are composed of organic and inorganic materials that are cheap to produce and easy to manufacture. However, these perovskites contain highly toxic lead and have poor environmental and thermodynamic stability and are made from toxic lead, so they are not good candidates for widespread commercial solar cells.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Using a combination of machine learning, data mining and electronic-structure calculations, Mishra will screen bismuth-based double perovskites to predict the best candidates for solar cell applications. Those compounds will then be synthesized and fabricated into solar cells in collaboration with Parag Banerjee, assistant professor of mechanical engineering & materials science, and Pratim Biswas, the Lucy & Stanley Lopata Professor, assistant vice chancellor for international programs and chair of the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering. The team will also work with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the atomic and electronic structure of the synthesized perovskites through electron microsopy to identify defects that can reduce solar cells’ efficiency and devise strategies to mitigate them.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Mishra’s research focuses on creating materials from the atomic scale with their properties tailored for targeted applications, such as solar cells and as catalysts for electrochemical reactions. His Materials, Modeling and Microscopy lab uses a synergistic combination of electronic structure calculations and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to develop quantitative structure property correlations and uses them to rationally design materials.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Mishra joined Washington University in St. Louis in 2015. Previously, he was a guest scientist and a postdoctoral scholar through Vanderbilt University at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn. He also was a fellow of the Center for Emergent Materials at The Ohio State University.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Mishra earned a doctorate in materials science and engineering from The Ohio State University in 2012 and a bachelor's degree in technology from the National Institute of Technology Karnataka in Surathkal, India in 2008.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Oak Ridge Associated Universities is a university consortium that combines the scientific strength of 121 major research institutions to advance science and education by partnering with national laboratories, government agencies and private industry.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p>Rohan MishraBeth Miller2017-06-05T05:00:00ZRohan Mishra was one of 36 recipients from among 125 applicants of the one-year award, which provides seed money to junior faculty at ORAU-associated institutions.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-engineering-students-win-national-titles-All-American-honors.aspx648WashU engineering students win national titles & All-American honors<p>​The Washington University in St. Louis women's track & field team was the top-ranked team all season and culminated the year with the first NCAA Division III Outdoor Track & Field Championship in program history and 22nd overall in school history, while the men added a ninth place finish as the Bears were one of just two programs to have both the women and men place in the top-10 at SPIRE Institute in Geneva, Ohio.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/OTF_Championships.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>The WashU women totaled 56 points as Ithaca College placed second (37) and Carthage College placed third (33). The WashU men placed ninth with 22 points while University of Wisconsin-La Crosse (47) took home the title.</p><p>Earning individual national titles were seniors <a href="http://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/track/2016-17/bios/ricketts_deko_e0wz" rtenodeid="4"><strong>Deko Ricketts</strong></a><strong> (mechanical engineering) </strong>and Rebecca Ridderhoff. Ricketts captured the 800m title for the men, gaining 10 points in a photo finish while Ridderhoff ran to a sub-minute time in the 400m hurdles. Ridderhoff's first place finish and 10 points helped push the Bears ahead of Ithaca.</p><p rtenodeid="5"><strong>1,500m</strong></p><p>Freshman <a href="http://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/track/2016-17/bios/matteucci_nick_113016" rtenodeid="2"><strong>Nick Matteucci</strong></a><strong> (chemical engineering) </strong>earned All-American honors in his first attempt at the outdoor championships. He placed fifth overall with a time of 3:54.33. </p><p><strong>400m Hurdles</strong><br/></p><p>Ridderhoff ran to the National Title in the 400m hurdles with a sub-minute time of 59.43, placing more than half of a second in front of the runner-up. Senior <a href="http://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/track/2016-17/bios/hancock_kelli_vupq" rtenodeid="5"><strong>Kelli Hancock</strong></a><strong> (biomedical engineering)</strong> placed third with a time of 1:00.15. Ridderhoff and Hancock combined for 16 points to supplant Ithaca for the team lead.<br/></p><p rtenodeid="4"><strong>Pole Vault</strong></p><p>Senior <a href="http://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/track/2016-17/bios/kleven_everett_113016" rtenodeid="3"><strong>Everett Kleven</strong></a><strong> (engineering)</strong> placed fourth for an All-American finish as he cleared a height of 5.15m. In his lone season competing for the Bears, Kleven earned All-American honors during both the indoor and outdoor seasons.<br/></p><p>For a full list of results, visit <a href="http://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/track/2016-17/releases/20170527s1mqs1">bearsports.wustl.edu.</a><br/></p>bearsports.wustl.eduhttp://bearsports.wustl.edu/sports/track/2016-17/releases/20170527s1mqs12017-05-27T05:00:00ZThe Washington University in St. Louis women's track & field team was the top-ranked team all season and culminated the year with the first NCAA Division III Outdoor Track & Field Championship in program history.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Infection-fighting-device-wins-2017-Discovery-Competition.aspx639Infection-fighting device wins $25,000 in 2017 Discovery Competition<p>​A medical device built by undergraduate students to prevent infections in patients using catheters has won $25,000 in the <a href="/current-students/outside-classroom/discovery-competition/Pages/default.aspx">2017 Discovery Competition</a>, sponsored by the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20Engineering%20Project%20Starfish%20Startup.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/News/34_.000">a</a></div><p>The winning team, named Project Starfish, is creating a device that uses short-wavelength ultraviolet light (UVC), which kills bacteria, molds, viruses and other pathogens, to continuously and effectively kill bacteria in urinary catheters. About 75 percent of urinary tract infections acquired in the hospital are associated with the use of a catheter, and up to 25 percent of hospitalized patients in the hospital receive a urinary catheter, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Project Starfish has received a provisional patent for its device and has confirmed with FDA consultants that the device will follow a relatively inexpensive regulatory pathway, said Elizabeth Bowman, a team member who received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering with a minor in commercial entrepreneurship May 19.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>With Bowman, other team members are:</p><p></p><ul><li rtenodeid="2">John Bisognono, a sophomore majoring in computer science with a minor in bioinformatics<br rtenodeid="4"/></li><li rtenodeid="5">Elliot Jaffe, a BS/MS student in electrical engineering with a second major in physics<br rtenodeid="7"/></li><li rtenodeid="8">Caleb Ji, a first-year student majoring in math<br rtenodeid="10"/></li><li rtenodeid="11">Daniel Lane, a doctoral student in biomedical engineering<br rtenodeid="13"/></li><li rtenodeid="14">Jessica Miller, founder and an MD/PhD student at the School of Medicine and in biomedical engineering<br rtenodeid="16"/></li><li rtenodeid="17">Vineet Chauhan and John Henschen, MBA students in the Olin Business School<br rtenodeid="20"/></li><li>Jay Vasileva, a graduating biomedical engineering student from Saint Louis University<br/></li></ul> The team plans to incorporate as a startup this summer.<p></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>“We’re really glad that we won this competition because we needed to the money to move us forward to the next step,” said Bowman, who plans to continue working on the project in addition to working as a health-care consultant in Silicon Valley.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>The team’s initial funding to build a 3-D prototype and a small circuit board came from Sling Health (formerly IDEA Labs).</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science launched the Discovery Competition in 2012 to promote new and innovative discoveries to solve challenges or needs. The competition provides engineering undergraduate students the forum to explore their entrepreneurial interests with support from mentors, to use their creativity to develop solutions for real-world problems and to compete for financial resources that could help turn their ideas into businesses. The annual competition is funded by Engineering alumni.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Taking second place, a $2,500 cash prize and $5,000 in legal in-kind services from Polsinelli was the CyberPowered Home LLC team, which developed a device to manage electric energy use in the home and provide smart-home functionality that could save users as much as 25 percent a year on electricity. Team members Will Blanchard, a junior majoring in computer engineering with second majors in financial engineering and economics & strategy, and Allen Nikka, who received a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering and a master of engineering in computer science with a minor in computer science May 19, say the device could pay for itself in two to five years and would benefit both homeowners and electric utility providers. Blanchard and Nikka plan to start a company this summer to continue work on the project.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Taking third place, which includes a $2,500 cash prize and $2,500 in in-kind legal services from Polsinelli, is SomniScan, a low-cost, in-home test for sleep disorders. More than 40 million Americans have a chronic sleep disorder, but up to 80 percent of them are undiagnosed due to the cost and access to overnight, in-hospital sleep studies. The SomniScan sleep-screening system would detect the presence of sleep disorders, particularly sleep apnea, using a smartphone and a $40-$80 purchase. The study would generate a report that a patient could take to his or her physician to follow up for further care.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members are:<br/></p><p></p><ul><li rtenodeid="23">Kenny Kim, who received a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering with minors in electrical engineering and biology May 19<br rtenodeid="25"/></li><li rtenodeid="26">Christian Shewmake, who received a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering and a master’s in systems science & engineering with a minor in computer science May 19<br rtenodeid="28"/></li><li>Teja Vallapuri, who received bachelor’s degrees in biomedical engineering and electrical engineering May 19<br/></li></ul> <br/>The team plans to incorporate this summer to continue work on the technology.<br/><p></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p>​​​​​<div><br/></div><div><br/> <div>​​<br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Entrepr​​eneurship at WashU</h3><ul><li> <a href="/our-school/initiatives/Pages/entrepreneurship.aspx">WashU engineers </a>are engaged in St. Louis' startup community and contribute to more than 20 accelerators and incubators.</li><li> <a href="http://fuse.wustl.edu/">WashU Fuse</a> - igniting innovation and connecting entrepreneurs​<br/></li></ul></div>​​​</div><br/></div>Project Starfish is a student startup company developing a biomedical device to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections.Beth Miller2017-05-22T05:00:00ZProject Starfish is a student startup company developing a biomedical device to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Four-faculty-members-receive-25000-WashU-Engineering-Collaboration-Initiation-Grants.aspx630Four faculty members receive $25,000 Collaboration Initiation Grants<p>​Matthew Lew, Mark Meacham, Jonathan Silva and Silvia Zhang, all assistant professors in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, have each received $25,000 grants from the school’s Collaboration Initiation Grants program.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20at%20Night%20by%20Clayco%20Corp.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/News/34_.000">a</a></div><p>The program, in its third year, awards one-year grants to projects that facilitate collaborative research outside of and within Engineering departments for tenure-track faculty. The grants are a pathway for faculty to apply for larger, interdisciplinary grants, to create a more synergistic project than could be achieved by one researcher in one discipline, and to demonstrate the potential to sustain the collaboration and obtain external funding. Each awardee receives $20,000 from the school and must have $5,000 in cost-sharing from their department or collaborators.</p><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Matthew-Lew.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Lew_Matthew_5620.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Matthew-Lew.aspx">Lew</a>, in the Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering, will work with James Buckley, professor of physics in Arts & Sciences, to build a single-molecule fluorescence-lifetime imaging nanoscope to view the chemical environments surrounding individual molecules with nanoscale resolution. These fluorescent molecules respond to changes in their chemical environment, such as pH, ionic strength or membrane potential by altering their fluorescence lifetime. Lew and Buckley plan to build an ultrafast camera with high sensitivity and fast frame rate, then integrate the camera with a fluorescence nanoscope to take images of the position and lifetime of fluorescent molecules. Once built, this technology is expected provide researchers with unparalleled resolution and insight into the dynamic chemical environments in living cells.<br/><br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Mark-Meacham.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Meacham_Mark.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/></a><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Mark-Meacham.aspx">Meacham</a>, in the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, will work with Mikhail Berezin, assistant professor of radiology at the School of Medicine, to reduce inconsistencies in producing fluorescent tumor-specific antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates through miniaturization and automation of synthetic steps in a microfluidic device. Such a platform would enable cancer researchers to speed development of new antibody conjugates that improve diagnosis or create powerful new targeted therapies to treat cancer patients. Key to this technology is use of acoustics, or ultrasound, to achieve better control over nanoscale synthetic processes, which would improve the consistency of the products that result. By replacing the current manual macroscale process with a more reliable, automated microfluidic approach, researchers would be able to perform process optimization and evaluate drug candidates more quickly to accelerate the pace of cancer research.<br/></p><p><br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Jonathan-Silva.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Silva_Jon.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/></a><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Jonathan-Silva.aspx">Silva</a>, in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, will work with Jonathan McJunkin, MD, in the Department of Otolaryngology at the School of Medicine, to create a 3-D holographic visualization of head and neck anatomy using mixed-reality display. This technology would improve their view of the surgical site and provide the potential to improve surgical outcomes in otolaryngology, which includes the ears and sinuses, where there are complex neurovascular structures.<br/></p><p><br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Xuan-(Silvia)-Zhang.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Zhang_Silvia_5631.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/></a><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Xuan-(Silvia)-Zhang.aspx">Zhang</a>, in the Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering, will work with Christopher Gill, professor of computer science & engineering, to focus on efficient and reliable power delivery for autonomous systems, such as self-driving cars, drones and robots. These systems have an uncertain power demand due to unpredictable interactions with the environment. Zhang and Gill plan to design new power modules using synergistic hardware and software approaches to deliver “energy packets” to different components that need power, similar to how data packets are delivered by networking routers in the Internet. In addition, they plan to develop an intelligent control scheme to improve reliability as well as efficiency for power delivery. Their ultimate goal is to build a functional prototype to assess the feasibility of their proposed power orchestration framework.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p>Beth Miller2017-05-10T05:00:00ZCollaboration Initiation Grants are a pathway for faculty to apply for larger, interdisciplinary grants and to create a more synergistic project than could be achieved by one researcher in one discipline.

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