https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/MDPhD-student-honored-at-international-engineering-conference.aspx567MD/PhD student honored at international engineering conference<p>​A paper authored by an MD/PhD candidate at Washington University in St. Louis recently took first prize at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition.</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Stephen%20Linderman.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Stephen Linderman's paper, presenting technology for improving surgical suturing for better tendon repairs, won the top honor in the biomedical engineering and technology track at the exhibition — the world's largest, cross-disciplinary mechanical engineering conference. Linderman's research is conducted through the university's Department of Orthopaedic Surgery in the School of Medicine, and the Department of Biomedical Engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science.</p><p>"Surgical suturing is a crude mechanical solution," said Linderman, the paper's first author. "Sutures are in tension along their length, but the load is predominantly transferred to the surrounding tissue where sutures bend at anchor points, and this leads to failed surgeries. We found a simple way to improve repair schemes by minimizing stress concentrations, without complicating the surgeon's workflow."</p><p>The paper identified the combination of strength and stiffness needed for an adhesive on the sutures to improve a surgical repair. </p><p>"An adhesive layer that is too stiff will make things worse by concentrating stresses, and an adhesive that is too weak will fail without improving the repair," said the paper's senior author, <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Guy-Genin.aspx">Guy M. Genin</a>, a professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at the School of Engineering & Applied Science. "Steve's breakthroughs were to identify the 'sweet spot' and then identify the classes of materials whose properties land in that spot. It was exciting to present this at a venue like the IMECE, where we could get feedback on our ideas from researchers with depth in a broad range of disciplines."</p><blockquote>Linderman's team presented a set of preliminary results that show the idea will work, and it is working to commercialize the technology. </blockquote> <p>"The preliminary data are promising and exciting, and the next round of adhesives we are working on show great promise for clinical application," said one of the co-authors, Stavros Thomopoulos, a former Washington University medical and engineering faculty member now Vice Chair of Orthopedic Surgery at Columbia University.</p><p>"IMECE is the place for researchers to present breakthroughs across the entire range of mechanical engineering disciplines," said Christine M. Reilley, director of business development in the Engineering Sciences Segment at ASME. "We are thrilled to recognize Linderman and his colleagues on their contributions to the field and look forward to hearing the impact of their work on humankind." </p><p>Other Washington University authors on the paper include: Ioannis Kormpakis, a clinical and research fellow in orthopedic surgery; and Richard H. Gelberman, MD, former head of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Ulrike Wegst, of Dartmouth College, and Victor Birman, of the Missouri University of Science and Technology are also authors. </p><p> <br/> </p> <span> <hr/></span> <p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 90 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 21,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.<br/></p><p> <strong>The research was funded by Washington University through a Musculoskeletal Research Center Translational Grant and through the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant number UL1 TR000448. </strong></p><p> <strong>Linderman SW, Kormpakis I, Gelberman RH, Birman V, Wegst UGK, Thomopoulos S, Genin GM. (2016). IMECE2016-67522: Shear lag sutures: Improved suture repair through the use of adhesives. ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference & Exhibition, Phoenix, AZ, November 11-17, 2016.</strong></p><p>​</p><p><br/></p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Meet Stephen Linderman</h3><div><ul><li><span style="font-size: 1em;">MD/PhD Candidate</span><br/></li><li><span style="font-size: 1em;">President, <a href="http://slinghealth.org/">Sling Health Network (formerly IDEA Labs)</a> - a student-run biotechnology incubator</span></li></ul></div></div></span>Stephen Linderman2017-01-31T06:00:00ZStephen Linderman's paper, presenting technology for improving surgical suturing for better tendon repairs, won the top honor in the biomedical engineering and technology track at the exhibition.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Storing-and-testing-at-any-temperature.aspx557Storing and testing at any temperature<div class="div.youtube-wrap"><div class="iframe-container"> <iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aBN9bbYnyXQ"></iframe> </div> </div><p>Many diagnostic tests use antibodies to help confirm a myriad of medical conditions, from Zika infections to heart ailments and even some forms of cancer. Antibodies capture and help detect proteins, enzymes, bacteria and viruses present in injuries and illnesses, and must be kept at a constant low temperature to ensure their viability — often requiring refrigeration powered by electricity. This can make diagnostic testing in underdeveloped countries, disaster or remote areas and even war zones extremely expensive and difficult.</p> <img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Antibodies-600x400.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis and Air Force Research Laboratory have discovered an inexpensive work-around: a protective coating that could completely eliminate the need for cold storage and change the scope of medical diagnostic testing in places where it’s often needed the most.</p><p>“In many developing countries, electricity is not guaranteed,” said <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx">Srikanth Singamaneni</a>, associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science in Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis.</p><p>“So how do we best get them medical diagnostics? We did not know how to solve this problem previously.”</p><p>Singamaneni’s team previously used tiny gold nanorods in bio-diagnostic research, measuring changes in their optical properties to quantify protein concentrations in bio-fluids: the higher a concentration, the higher the likelihood of injury or disease.</p><p>In this new research, <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.201604433/full">published in Advanced Materials</a>, Singamaneni worked with faculty from Washington University’s School of Medicine and researchers from the Air Force Research Lab to grow metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) around antibodies attached to gold nanorods. The crystalline MOFs formed a protective layer around the antibodies and prevented them from losing activity at elevated temperatures. The protective effect lasted for a week even when the samples were stored at 60°C.</p><p>“This technology would allow point-of-care screening for biomarkers of diseases in urban and rural clinic settings where immediate patient follow-up is critical to treatment and wellbeing,” said Dr. Jeremiah J. Morrissey, professor of anesthesiology, Division of Clinical and Translational Research, Washington University School of Medicine and a co-author on the paper.</p><p>“On the spot testing eliminates the time lag in sending blood/urine samples to a central lab for testing and in tracking down patients to discuss test results. In addition, it may reduce costs associated with refrigerated shipping and storage.”</p><p>The protective MOF layer can be quickly and easily removed from the antibodies with a simple rinse of slightly acidic water, making a diagnostic strip or paper immediately ready to use. Singamaneni says this proof of concept research is now ready to be tested for clinical samples.</p><p>“As long as you are using antibodies, you can use this technology,” said Congzhou Wang, a postdoctoral researcher in Singamaneni’s lab and the paper’s lead author. “In bio-diagnostics from here on out, we will no longer need refrigeration.”</p><p>“The MOF-based protection of antibodies on sensor surfaces is ideal for preserving biorecognition abilities of sensors that are designed for deployment in the battlefield,” said Dr. Rajesh R. Naik, 711th Human Performance Wing of the Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, and a co-corresponding author of the paper.  “It provides remarkable stability and extremely easy to remove right before use.”</p><p>Singamaneni may be reached for interviews at <a href="mailto:singamaneni@wustl.edu">singamaneni@wustl.edu</a></p><p rtenodeid="6"><strong>This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant Nos. FA9550-15-1-0228 and 12RX11COR), AFRL/711 HPW, and the National Institutes of Health (Grant Nos. R21DK100759 and R01 CA141521).</strong></p><p rtenodeid="7"><strong>Patent and other support is provided by the Washington University Office of Technology Management, which assists university faculty in the transfer of technology from the lab to the global marketplace.</strong></p><div><br/></div> <br/> <br/> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Nanomaterials Research at WashU Engineering </h3><div><ul><li> <strong style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="/news/Pages/Dirty-to-drinkable.aspx">Engineers develop novel hybrid nanomaterials to transform water</a> </strong> <br/></li><li> <strong style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="/news/Pages/Using-nanotechnology-to-benefit-energy-the-environment-health.aspx">Using nanotechnology to benefit energy, the environment, health</a> </strong></li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/WashU-engineers-to-use-cyborg-insects-as-biorobotic-sensing-machines.aspx">Engineers to use cyborg insects as biorobotic sensing machines</a></li></ul></div></div></span>Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis develop new nanoparticle technology that eliminates the need for cold storage in some medical diagnostic tests.Erika Ebsworth-Gooldhttps://source.wustl.edu/2017/01/storing-testing-temperature/2017-01-04T06:00:00ZEngineers at Washington University in St. Louis develop new nanoparticle technology that eliminates the need for cold storage in some medical diagnostic tests.<p>New nanoparticle discovery may eliminate cold storage for some tests</p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Engineer-develops-model-to-predict-behavior-of-cell-clusters.aspx541Engineer develops model to predict behavior of cell clustersAn engineer at Washington University in St. Louis discovered a model in which the mechanics of the cells’ environment can predict their movement, a finding that ultimately could mean confining cell transition in tumors and potentially making cancer “a substantially less deadly disease,” said the lead researcher.​<br/><br/> <div class="div.youtube-wrap"><div class="iframe-container"> <iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/q8kr7hT8EzU"></iframe> </div> ​</div><p></p>​<img alt="Amit Pathak" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Pathak_Amit.jpg?RenditionID=6" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Amit-Pathak.aspx">​​​​​Amit Pathak</a>, assistant professor of mechanical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science,  found that a cell-transitioning process implicated in tumor metastasis is influenced by the cells’ environment.</p><p>In new research published in Biophysical Journal, Pathak used computational modeling to show that epithelial cells are more likely to break off from their clusters in a confined environment, in either stiff or soft tissue. Pathak’s model is the first to show that various mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix can predict the state of cell clusters of defined shapes and sizes.</p><p>Epithelial cells, which are found in blood vessels and in the lining of various organs in the body, can change into mesenchymal cells, which are important in both embryonic development and cancer metastasis. In previous research, published in Scientific Reports, Pathak and Samila Nasrollahi, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering, showed that the stiffer the tissues, the more likely a process called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) will take place.</p><p>Surprisingly, the EMT goes up in when cell clusters are confined within 3-D environments, compared with standard 2-D cell-culture conditions. EMT comes into play in the development of embryos, when epithelial cells break out of clusters and transition into mesenchymal cells to aid organ development. However, it also is a crucial process in cancer metastasis, said Pathak.</p><p>“In cancer, if tumor cells do not decluster and escape, it is a favorable scenario because the tumor will stay in one place,” said Pathak, whose lab studies mechanobiology, or the intersection of mechanics and biology. “But when a cancer cell moves and leaves the tumor, it goes to another place and populates new tumors. If we can stop the EMT process right at the primary tumor, then cancer will be a substantially less deadly disease.”</p><p>​</p> <span><hr/></span> <p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 23,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p><p> <br/> </p><p>​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Intersection of Mechanics & Biology</h3><div style="text-align: center;">“In cancer, if tumor cells do not decluster and escape, it is a favorable scenario because the tumor will stay in one place, but when a cancer cell moves and leaves the tumor, it goes to another place and populates new tumors. If we can stop the EMT process right at the primary tumor, then cancer will be a substantially less deadly disease.”</div><div style="text-align: center;"><br/></div><div style="text-align: center;">- <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Amit-Pathak.aspx">Amit Pathak​</a><strong style="color: #222222;">​</strong><br/></div></div></span>Amit PathakBeth Miller2016-11-15T06:00:00ZA mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis discovered that a cell-transitioning process implicated in tumor metastasis is influenced by the mechanics of the cells’ environment.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/NSF-gives-5-million-boost-to-STEM-higher-education-in-Missouri.aspx524NSF gives $5 million boost to STEM higher education in Missouri<p>​Washington University part of statewide consortium that aims to double STEM degree attainment among underrepresented minorities</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/MoLSAMP-1024x817.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />​​​​Washington University in St. Louis is part of an alliance of Missouri institutions of higher education that recently received a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund efforts to more than double underrepresented minority science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) graduates in Missouri within five years. <div><p>​The alliance, part of the NSF’s Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation program in Missouri (MoLSAMP), includes Washington University, as well as Harris-Stowe State University; Lincoln University; the Center for Plant and Life Sciences at St. Louis Community College; Truman State University; the University of Central Missouri, the University of Missouri-Columbia; and the University of Missouri-St. Louis.</p><p>“It’s a significant opportunity to bring the LSAMP program to Missouri,” said Dedric Carter, vice chancellor for operations and technology transfer and co-principal investigator on the NSF grant. </p><blockquote>“Our state’s continued excellence in STEM requires that we grow the diversity of the students choosing and remaining in the STEM disciplines,” Carter said. “Introducing research and entrepreneurial outlets to these students will help to expand their possibilities.”</blockquote> <p>As part of MoLSAMP’s STEM retention efforts, Washington University will provide research practice opportunities and unique entrepreneurial exposure in St. Louis, as well as strategic advising, academic support and other tools to help students persist in STEM majors.</p><p>The university’s MoLSAMP-related activities will draw on the infrastructure of the Washington University <a href="/current-students/student-services/Pages/wusef.aspx">Summer Engineering Fellowship program</a> in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, administered by Emily Boyd, a principal lecturer in the department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, and the internship programs led by Rochelle Smith, assistant provost for Diversity Initiatives.</p><p>These efforts at the university will operate in concert with umbrella activities to grow STEM retention among alliance members Missouri.</p><p>According to Carter, the LSAMP grant provides an added catalyst for the important efforts already underway at the university to ensure student achievement, including a partnership with the newly created Office of Student Success, lead by assistant provost Tony Tillman, in preparing underrepresented students at Washington University for the research and practice activities offered by the alliance.</p><p>MoLSAMP aims to expand the number of underrepresented minority STEM graduates in Missouri from 283 to beyond 630 by 2021. Underrepresented minorities are identified by LSAMP as African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and Native Pacific Islanders.</p><p>The MoLSAMP program is the 46th such alliance in the nation. The LSAMP program provides funding to alliances that implement comprehensive, evidence-based, innovative, and sustained strategies that ultimately result in the graduation of well-prepared, highly-qualified students from underrepresented groups who pursue graduate studies or careers in STEM. The LSAMP program is in its 25th year.</p><p>The program is named for Ohio Congressman Louis Stokes, who helped focus federal attention on the nation’s poor, and led a special House of Representatives investigation into the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  When Stokes retired from Congress in 1999, the Alliances for Minority Participation program was renamed the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation – or LSAMP.  Congressman Stokes passed away in 2015.</p></div><p>​​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Alliance Members</h3><div><ul><li>Harris-Stowe State University<br/></li><li>Lincoln University​<br/></li><li>St. Louis Community College<br/></li><li>Truman State University<br/></li><li>University of Central Missouri<br/></li><li>University of Missouri<br/></li><li>University of Missouri-St. Louis<br/></li></ul></div></div></span>  ​<div>​<br/><div><span><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage</h3><div rtenodeid="4">Huffington Post: <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-randazzo/sparking-curiosity-stem_b_12054622.html">Sparking Curiosity in STEM, In And Outside The Classroom​</a></div></div></span><br/></div></div>Rochelle Smith (right) and Dedric Carter (center) help Art Hicks of the NSF’s Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation program announce the $5 million grant that will aid a consortium of higher education institutions in Missouri. source.wustl.eduhttps://source.wustl.edu/2016/10/nsf-gives-5-million-boost-stem-higher-education-missouri/2016-10-24T05:00:00ZWashington University in St. Louis is part of an alliance that recently received a $5 million grant from the NSF to fund efforts to more than double underrepresented minority STEM graduates in Missouri.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Designs-shared-for-east-end-of-Danforth-Campus.aspx519Designs shared for east end of Danforth Campus<p>​Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton shared plans for the transformation of the east end of the Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. Louis to the Board of Trustees during its Oct. 7 meeting. He presented designs for the seven major components of the undertaking — two new academic buildings, an expansion of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, two new multi-use facilities, an underground parking garage and an expansive new Central Green.</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Jubel%20Hall.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​​​​​​​​​​​​“The transformation of the east end of the Danforth Campus is both a tremendous challenge and an unparalleled opportunity for Washington University,” Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton said. “It will be the most expensive and complicated construction project in the history of our university, but when completed it will set the course for the next era of development and academic excellence for our scholars and students. This is an investment in the future.”</p><p>Work on the project — the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus — will begin following Commencement in the spring of 2017. When work is completed in 2019, a transformed entrance will greet visitors to Washington University, and the facilities on the east end will foster a stronger programmatic and physical link to the rest of the Danforth Campus.</p><p>“Weil Hall is making it possible, for the first time in recent history, to unite our programs in art, architecture, and design on the Danforth Campus,” said Carmon Colangelo, dean of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts.</p><p>“This major addition to our facilities will provide us with beautiful studios, social spaces, an inspiring sculpture garden and state-of-the art technologies such a new digital fabrication lab. Weil Hall will also ensure critical adjacencies for all our students to resources such as the expanded Kemper Art Museum and its world-class collection.”</p><p>Aaron Bobick, the James M. McKelvey Professor and Dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science, said that the construction of Jubel Hall will both enrich the experience of undergraduates as well as support fundamental research, discovery and innovation.</p><p>“The inclusion of a makerspace and the connection to the design and makerspaces in Weil Hall and the Sam Fox School will provide opportunity to inject more design thinking into the School of Engineering,” Bobick said. “Additionally, these new facilities will enhance our ability to pursue interdisciplinary research between the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science and departments such as biomedical engineering in Whitaker Hall, which will connect to Jubel Hall through a spectacular bridge.”</p><p>Key components of the plan for the east end of the Danforth Campus:</p><div class="ms-rtestate-read ms-rte-wpbox" contenteditable="false"><div class="ms-rtestate-notify ms-rtestate-read 1db0ac23-828b-462e-ac06-8fc206f6e1f2" id="div_1db0ac23-828b-462e-ac06-8fc206f6e1f2"></div><div id="vid_1db0ac23-828b-462e-ac06-8fc206f6e1f2" style="display: none;"></div></div><p>​Roll over the map to view the main elements of the east end of the Danforth Campus project.</p><p>Read the full story on <a href="https://source.wustl.edu/2016/10/designs-shared-east-end-danforth-campus/">source.wustl.edu.​</a><br/><br/>More information and project updates will be available at <a href="http://campusnext.wustl.edu/" style="background-color: #ffffff;">campusnext.wustl.edu</a>.<br/></p><p></p><p>​​​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Henry A. and <br/>Elvira H. Jubel Hall</h3><div> <strong></strong></div><p style="text-align: center;"></p><ul style="text-align: left;"><li>Construction for the new home of the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science will begin in 2017.​</li><li> <span style="font-size: 1em;">Mechanical engineers will work with physicists, chemists, biologists, and chemical and biomedical engineers to promote the convergence of mechanics, materials science, and nanotechnology.</span><br/></li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Engineering-Momentum-Mechanical-Engineering-and-Materials-Science-to-anchor-Henry-A.-and-Elvira-H.-Jubel-Hall.aspx" style="font-size: 1em; background-color: #ffffff;">2013 Announcement: ​Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science to anchor Henry A. & Elvira H. Jubel Hall</a><br/></li><li> <a href="/our-school/why-wash-u-engineering/facilities/Pages/default.aspx">WashU Engineering Facilities & New Complex​</a></li></ul><p></p></div></span>​ <div>​<span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage​</h3><div>St. Louis Business Journal: ​Washington University unveils ‘most expensive’ construction project in school history</div></div></span>​<br/></div>Construction for the new home of the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science will begin in 2017.source.wustl.eduhttps://source.wustl.edu/2016/10/designs-shared-east-end-danforth-campus/2016-10-11T05:00:00ZConstruction for the new home of the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science will begin in 2017.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/NSF-announces-new-Science-and-Technology-Center.aspx513NSF announces new Science and Technology Center<p>​Washington University-Penn partnership will investigate biology’s mechanics​</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Green-Brauer-760x506.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​​The National Science Foundation (NSF) has added a newly formed collaboration between Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Pennsylvania to its list of Science and Technology Centers (STC). The center and its collaborative efforts will be supported by a $23.6 million grant from the NSF.</p><p>“This award from the National Science Foundation reflects outstanding faculty achievement at Washington University in St. Louis,” Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton said. “As the university advances its commitment to groundbreaking, high-impact research, winning the new Science and Technology Center is a major accomplishment.”</p><p> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/CEMB-300x95.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 10px; clear: both;"/>The Science and Technology Center for Engineering MechanoBiology (CEMB) will bring together a consortium of researchers including engineers, biologists and biophysicists. The group’s mission: identify and harness the mechanical functions of both plants and animals at the cellular level. Mechanical force is a critical component of all biological systems, allowing cells to divide, migrate, adapt and differentiate. It is hoped that this deeper dive into how single cells function will transform both medicine and plant science.</p><p>“The STC grant represents significant support from the National Science Foundation for a large-scale, complex research undertaking,” said Dedric Carter, vice chancellor for operations & tech transfer at Washington University. Carter, a former senior adviser for strategic initiatives at the NSF, participated as part of Washington University senior leadership during the site visit process.</p><p>“This is a remarkable opportunity for Washington University to advance its international leadership in research and innovation in a potentially transformative area,” Carter said. “We look forward to the great work that will likely emerge from this new center.”</p><div style="width: 300px; float: left; margin: 0px 10px 10px; text-align: center; font-style: italic; color: #555555;"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Genin_Guy.jpg?RenditionID=6" alt="Guy Genin" style="margin: 5px;"/> <br/>Guy Genin</div><p>“Mechanobiology has incredible potential,” said <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Guy-Genin.aspx">Guy Genin</a>, professor of mechanical engineering & materials science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and principal investigator of Washington University’s portion of the grant. “It could change the way we view many of the world’s most complex questions and issues.</p><p>“For the field to fully realize its enormous potential, a large commitment and scope of study is needed,” Genin said. “We are most grateful for the National Science Foundation’s support. Being named an STC is a prestigious distinction reserved for sweeping research projects that have the power to change lives. We’re ready to get to work.”</p><p>Every plant and animal living today evolved from a single-celled organism. The Washington University-Penn STC will investigate the mechanics at work on the singular cell level, and examine how the cell reacts to electrical and mechanical forces. The hope is that by better understanding the processes in place and at play, cellular “override switches” will be developed that lead to a host of new bio-inspired developments, including disease prevention and more efficient crop practices.</p><p>“The possible advances that could be realized with this research team and our collaborators are nearly limitless. If we can override cellular mechanical behavior, we could stop cancer cells from metastasizing,” Genin said. “We could also improve our bodies’ system functions, and vastly change the way we approach injuries, with the potential to speed up rehab.”</p><p>“Changing plants’ cellular behavior could allow us to develop hardier crops and more sustainable growing methods, transforming the ways that we feed people,” said Lucia Strader, assistant professor in the Department of Biology in Arts & Sciences, who is co-directing the research. “However, to realize the true potential of this field, we need to move from individual innovations to collaborative leadership. We’re thrilled to be part of that transition via the new STC.”</p><p>Rounding out the Washington University team are <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Marcus-Foston.aspx">Marcus Foston</a>, assistant professor, and Barbara Pickard, professor emerita of biology, both in the School of Engineering & Applied Science; and Ram Dixit, associate professor of biology; Elizabeth Haswell, associate professor of biology; and Anders Carlsson, professor of physics, all in Arts & Sciences.</p><p>In addition to scientists from Washington University and Penn, a diverse group of researchers from Alabama State University, Boston University, Bryn Mawr College, the University of Texas and the New Jersey Institute of Technology will also join in the effort.</p><p>“This center will bring together an unprecedented set of leading experts and cutting-edge facilities,” said Aaron Bobick, dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science, who facilitated planning for the university and coordinated with his long-time colleague Vijay Kumar, dean of engineering at Penn. “This grant positions Washington University and our partners to make rapid and transformative progress in one of the university’s key areas of international leadership.”</p><p>The STC consortium represents investigators and laboratories that are leading the field in areas related to mechanobiology and will focus on three specific areas related to cell mechanics: the individual molecules that generate and respond to force; the larger extracellular and support structures that help determine cellular behavior; and novel materials and micro-engineering physiologic systems.</p><p>These selected areas of focus build upon the research expertise available in the team members’ laboratories, and the capabilities that will be developed by bringing the STC team together. Four research projects are planned to illustrate how the STC will integrate its focus areas to address the most important research questions in the field of mechanobiology. Those projects are expected to run the full range of size and scope: from single molecule experiments on up to whole organisms, with elapsed time stretching from milliseconds to months.</p><p>Harnessing the full potential of these results will involve a series of innovative new modeling and experimental techniques, and Dixit has the role of ensuring that information is distributed broadly and creatively across industry and academia, and of fostering innovation in intellectual property.</p><p>“The resources for innovation and entrepreneurship at Washington University are truly exceptional,” Dixit said. “Our office of technology management had been creative and effective in coordinating with similar offices at Penn and our other partner institutions to streamline our efforts to make a maximal impact. We have tremendous opportunity to make a real and lasting impact through this work.”</p><p>The STC also will include a teaching component, with consortium members training students in the field of engineering mechanobiology, and preparing them for careers as innovative leaders, who are ready to collaborate in order to solve society’s biggest problems.</p><p>“While we are thrilled to assemble this all-star team to investigate the mechanics of cells, everyone involved in the STC is also very much looking forward to the mentorship piece of this project,” Genin said. “It is of vital importance to instruct and nurture younger scientists as we embark on this complex, far-reaching work.”</p><p>“This new center will link together the research and teaching efforts at Washington University with those at the partner institutions in innovative ways that we have never tried before, including opening up the university’s cutting-edge facilities and graduate catalog to the CEMB’s faculty and students at all partner institutions,” said Provost Holden Thorp. “CEMB will be a vital part of our university’s innovation ecosystem, and will lengthen the leverage of many of our key international strengths in engineering and life sciences.”</p><p>​​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage​​​​</h3><div> St. Louis Post-Dispatch: <a href="http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/education/washu-receives-million-science-grant-to-understand-how-single-cells/article_6b7d2964-b642-5aa3-9e16-94ed193428c0.html">"WashU receives $23.6 million science grant to understand how single cells work​​​"</a><br/><br/>St. Louis Business Journal: ​​<a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/news/2016/09/26/washington-university-gets-23-million-grant-to.html?ana=e_stl_bn_newsalert&u=qi6EzeXFB4iH8KhEAQj2aiGiST2&t=1474909170&j=75909592">Washington University gets $23 million grant to form center to study cell activity​​</a><br/><br/>St. Louis Public Radio KWMU: <a href="http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/washington-university-receives-funding-research-could-change-medicine-and-agriculture#stream/0">Washington University receives funding for research that could change medicine and agriculture​</a></div></div></span>​The NSF has added a collaboration between Washington University and the University of Pennsylvania to its list of Science and Technology Centers. The majority of the center's work will take place in Green Hall.Erika Ebsworth-Gooldhttps://source.wustl.edu/2016/09/nsf-announces-new-science-technology-center/2016-09-26T05:00:00ZWashington University-Penn partnership will investigate biology’s mechanics.

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