https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/New-era-in-engineering-to-begin-at-Washington-University.aspx1012New era in engineering to begin at Washington University<p>​</p><div class="ms-rtestate-read ms-rte-wpbox" contenteditable="false"><div class="ms-rtestate-notify ms-rtestate-read abdb52fc-e2f3-4ad0-9502-27fc91fb9fc7" id="div_abdb52fc-e2f3-4ad0-9502-27fc91fb9fc7" unselectable="on"></div><div id="vid_abdb52fc-e2f3-4ad0-9502-27fc91fb9fc7" unselectable="on" style="display: none;"></div></div><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/131101_sjh_jim_mckelvey_53.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Furthering its strong trajectory as a leader in research and innovation, the Engineering school at Washington University in St. Louis is taking a major leap forward and reaffirming its commitment to tackling the world’s great engineering challenges with renewed vigor, an ambitious strategic vision <g class="gr_ gr_58 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="58" data-gr-id="58">and</g> a new name.<br/></p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science will be renamed the James McKelvey School of Engineering in honor of trustee and distinguished alumnus Jim McKelvey Jr., who has made an unprecedented and transformative investment in the school.<br/> <br/>“The McKelvey name has become synonymous with innovation and entrepreneurship in the St. Louis region and well beyond,” said Chancellor Mark Wrighton. “There is no better way to make a statement about what our Engineering school stands for than by giving it a name that represents being ahead of the curve and blazing a trail of creative problem solving through technology.<div><br/>“This is a historic milestone for the university and comes at a perfect time — when we are sharpening our efforts to advance innovation and entrepreneurship, coupling science with technology in all fields from computer science to biomedical engineering and attacking global challenges such as energy and the environment. We are tremendously grateful to Jim for this investment, which expands the significant contributions the McKelvey family has made to this institution.”<div><br/>The commitment will be used to fund endowed scholarships and professorships, as well as the dean’s highest priorities for advancing the school and its impact on lives and communities in St. Louis and around the world. In particular, the commitment will allow the school to create educational and research programs that integrate computing with the humanities, social sciences, arts <g class="gr_ gr_72 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="72" data-gr-id="72">and</g> other disciplines, and it will support the school’s effort to enhance the region’s innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystem. In addition to major support for facilities, McKelvey Jr.’s past giving includes scholarships and general support for the Engineering school.<br/></div><div><br/></div><div> <blockquote>“Under the strong leadership of Dean Aaron Bobick, the Engineering school is positioned for true greatness, and this is the right time to step forward with this investment,” McKelvey Jr. said. “Engineering fields are moving at an exponential growth rate, and to keep up with that requires tremendous investment of resources: human, physical and financial.”</blockquote>“This is a great day for the School of Engineering and for the university,” said Chancellor-elect Andrew D. Martin. “We are embarking on a new era that builds on the momentum and energy under Dean Bobick’s leadership. We will unleash the tremendous potential of our smart and talented students and faculty and see where their talents will take us in the new world of technology and innovation. Thanks to the unwavering generosity and support of the entire McKelvey family, the possibilities are limitless. We are profoundly grateful.”<br/>  <br/>McKelvey Jr.’s family — including his wife, Anna; his father, James McKelvey Sr., an alumnus and iconic former dean of the Engineering school; his late mother, Edith McKelvey; and his stepmother, alumna Judith McKelvey, MD — has a long legacy of dedication to Washington University. “We are a Washington University family through and through,” McKelvey Jr. said. “This university has meant so much to us, and it is my privilege to continue our role in providing for the Engineering school’s future.”<br/> <br/>“We are extraordinarily grateful to Jim Jr. and his family for their incredible history of generosity to the Engineering school. Particularly now, while we stand poised to truly transform our approach to research, innovation <g class="gr_ gr_60 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="60" data-gr-id="60">and</g> learning, this new commitment will allow us to advance the McKelvey School of Engineering into the next tier of top engineering programs in this country and the world,” said Bobick, who also is the James M. McKelvey Professor.</div><div><br/>  <blockquote>“This tremendous gift creates new opportunities for our students and faculty to tackle the world’s greatest engineering challenges, and to dramatically expand computing throughout the university. At the same time, it helps ensure that a diverse population of students will have access to a world-class engineering education and enable the school to be a catalyst for economic development for the St. Louis region and beyond,” said Bobick. <br/></blockquote> <br/>Founded in 1857, Washington University’s Engineering school promotes independent inquiry and education with an emphasis on scientific excellence, innovation <g class="gr_ gr_66 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="66" data-gr-id="66">and</g> collaboration without boundaries. With top-ranked research programs in biomedical engineering, environmental engineering <g class="gr_ gr_67 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="67" data-gr-id="67">and</g> computer science, the school attracts many of the best students from around the world to its 40 different degree programs. The school recently launched several new graduate programs, including an interdisciplinary doctoral program in imaging science, one of only two such programs in the United States; an innovative doctoral program that combines data sciences with social work, political science and psychological and brain sciences; and a new master’s program in cybersecurity engineering. New bachelor’s programs include environmental engineering, a joint business <g class="gr_ gr_68 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="68" data-gr-id="68">and</g> computer science degree, and a joint math and computer science degree. Key components of the university’s current east end campus transformation include two major facilities for engineering: James M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall (to open in 2020) for the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and other computational programs, and Henry A. and Elvira H. Jubel Hall (to open in 2019) for the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science. Since 2000, the school has invested more than $250 million in new and renovated space, which includes 700,000 square feet in the new engineering complex.<br/> <br/>McKelvey Hall was made possible by a $15 million commitment from McKelvey Jr. in 2016 to honor his father who, during his 27 years as dean, transformed the Engineering school from a regional program into a nationally prominent research institution. McKelvey greatly strengthened the quality of the undergraduate and graduate curricula, particularly in emerging fields including computer science; significantly increased both undergraduate and graduate student enrollment; expanded the faculty; dramatically increased federal and other research funding; and grew the endowment for the school more than tenfold from $4 million to nearly $52 million. He also oversaw a remarkable expansion of the school’s footprint on the Danforth Campus.</div><div><br/> <div><span style="color: #666666; font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em;">About Jim McKelvey Jr.</span><br/>Jim McKelvey Jr. is a successful serial entrepreneur and co-founder of Square, <g class="gr_ gr_56 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-del replaceWithoutSep" id="56" data-gr-id="56">a revolutionary</g> financial services and mobile payment company credited with empowering businesses of all sizes around the globe.<br/> <br/>McKelvey Jr. is an independent director of the St. Louis Federal Reserve but is better known for his involvement in several St. Louis­-based startups, including Six Thirty (co-founder), LaunchCode (founder), Third Degree Glass Factory (co-founder), Mira Publishing (founded when he was a Washington University student) and Square, the company he founded in 2009 with Jack Dorsey. He also is the author of “The Art of Fire: Beginning Glassblowing,” the leading textbook for novice glassblowers.<br/> <br/>As a child, McKelvey Jr. spent formative time at the Engineering school with his father during his tenure as dean. He applied early decision to Washington University and enrolled in 1983, graduating in 1987 with degrees in economics and computer science. While a student, McKelvey Jr. wrote two computer programming textbooks.<br/> <br/>In 2012, the Engineering school presented McKelvey Jr. with its Alumni Achievement Award to recognize his groundbreaking entrepreneurship. In 2017, the university recognized him with the Robert S. Brookings Award, which honors individuals for their extraordinary dedication and generosity to Washington University. In addition to currently serving as a university trustee, he also has served as a member of the Alumni Board of Governors. <br/></div></div></div>​<span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>McKelvey Family<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><img class="ms-rtePosition-3" src="/news/PublishingImages/131101_sjh_jim_mckelvey_53.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong>​Jim McKelvey Jr.</strong><br rtenodeid="69"/></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="color: #343434; padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434;"><li>Serial entrepreneur<br/></li><li>Co-founder of Square<br/></li><li>Wrote two computer programming books while in school<br/></li><li>WashU BS '87 — economics and computer science<br/></li></ul></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><img src="/news/PublishingImages/James%20McKelvey.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>​ </strong></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="text-align: center; color: #343434;"><a href="/news/Pages/Using-bacteria-to-create-a-water-filter-that-kills-bacteria.aspx"> </a><strong>James McKelvey Sr.</strong></span><br/></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="color: #343434; padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434;"><li>WashU MS '47, PhD '50 — chemical engineering<br/></li><li>WashU Engineering Dean for 27 years<br/></li></ul></div></div></span>​​  ​ <br/><br/>Jim McKelvey Jr. has made an unprecedented and transformative investment in engineering education at Washington University. (Photo: Sid Hastings/Washington University)Julie Hail Floryhttps://source.wustl.edu/?p=318978&preview=1&_ppp=c465b4de032019-01-31T06:00:00Z​Renamed McKelvey School of Engineering will take innovation, technology and academics to new heights <p>​Renamed McKelvey School of Engineering will take innovation, technology and academics to new heights  <br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Bacteria-help-create-water-filter-that-kills-other-bacteria.aspx1009In the media: Bacteria help create water filter that kills other bacteria<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Study-on-bacteria-helping-make-water-filter.jpg?RenditionID=11" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​Researchers used a traitor bacterium to help them build a graphene water filter that destroys other bacteria. They say that their new water filter can clean water twice as fast as current commercially available ultrafiltration membranes. The research team said that creating the water filter was like ‘3D printing with microorganisms.’</p>The researchers, from Washington University in St. Louis and Seoul National University, wrote about their work in the journal Environmental Science & Technology (citation below).<div><br/>Over 10% of the world’s population lacks basic access to drinking water. By 2025, half of everyone on Earth will be living in water-stressed regions.<br/><br/></div><div>The authors say they have designed a new membrane technology that purifies water. It also prevents the accumulation of bacteria and other harmful microbes, i.e., biofouling, that diminishes the flow of water.</div><div><br/>To build such filtering membranes, they used bacteria that kill other harmful microorganisms.<br/></div><div><h3>Nanocellulose and graphene oxide</h3>Srikanth Singamaneni, Young-Shin, and their teams got together to develop an ultrafiltration membrane. They used bacterial nanocellulose and graphene oxide. The bacterial nanocellulose was long-lasting, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly, they found.<br/>Young-Shin Jun is a Professor of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering. Srikanth Singamaneni is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science. They both work at Washington University’s School of Engineering & Applied Science.<p><br/></p></div>​<span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Collabo​rators​</h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Singamaneni_Srikanth.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a></strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx"><strong>​Srikanth Singa​maneni</strong></a><br/></strong></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434; color: #343434;"><li>Expertise: Plasmonic nanostructures for chemical and biological sensors and nanomedicine<br/></li></ul></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Young-Shin-Jun.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jun_Young-Shin.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>​</a> </strong></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="color: #343434; text-align: center;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Using-bacteria-to-create-a-water-filter-that-kills-bacteria.aspx"> <strong>Young-Shin Jun</strong></a></span><br/></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434; color: #343434;"><li>Expertise: Environmental nanochemistry to address challenges in energy and water by controlling nucleation and reactions at water-solid interfaces<br/></li></ul></div></div></span>​​  ​ <br/>Details about the study appeared on the cover of the journal ‘Environmental Science & Technology.’ (Image: source.wustl.edu)Christian Nordqvist, Market Business Newshttps://marketbusinessnews.com/bacteria-water-filter/194657/2019-01-22T06:00:00ZResearchers used a traitor bacterium to help them build a graphene water filter that destroys other bacteria.<p><a href="https://marketbusinessnews.com/bacteria-water-filter/194657/">​>> Read the full article on Market Business News</a><br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Using-bacteria-to-create-a-water-filter-that-kills-bacteria.aspx1006Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/image001.jpg?RenditionID=9" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>More than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world's population will be living in water-stressed areas, which is why access to clean water is one of the National Academy of Engineering's Grand Challenges. Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have designed a novel membrane technology that purifies water while preventing biofouling, or buildup of bacteria and other harmful microorganisms that reduce the flow of water, and they used bacteria to build such membranes.</p><p>Srikanth Singamaneni, professor of mechanical engineering & materials science, and Young-Shin Jun, professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering, and their teams blended their expertise to develop an ultrafiltration membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial <g class="gr_ gr_44 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="44" data-gr-id="44">nanocellulose</g> that they found to be highly efficient, long-lasting and environmentally friendly. If their technique were to be scaled up to a large size, it could benefit developing countries where clean water is scarce.</p><p>The results of their work were published as the cover story in <em><a href="https://pubs.acs.org/toc/esthag/53/1">Environmental Science & Technology</a></em> Jan. 2, 2019.</p><p>Biofouling accounts for nearly half of all membrane fouling and is very challenging to remove completely. Singamaneni and Jun have been tackling this challenge together for nearly 5 years and have previously developed other membranes using gold nanostars, but wanted to design one that used less expensive materials.</p><p>Their new membrane begins with feeding <em>Gluconacetobacter <g class="gr_ gr_49 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="49" data-gr-id="49">hansenii</g></em> bacteria a sugary substance so that they form cellulose nanofibers when in water. The team then incorporated graphene oxide (GO) flakes into the bacterial <g class="gr_ gr_50 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="50" data-gr-id="50">nanocellulose</g> while it was growing, essentially trapping GO in the membrane to make it very stable and durable. After GO is incorporated into the membrane, the membrane is treated with <g class="gr_ gr_64 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="64" data-gr-id="64">base</g> solution to kill <em>Gluconacetobacter</em>. During this process, the oxygen groups of GO are eliminated, making it reduced graphene oxide. When the team shone sunlight onto the membrane, the reduced graphene oxide flakes immediately generated heat, which is dissipated into the surrounding water and bacteria <g class="gr_ gr_51 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="51" data-gr-id="51">nanocellulose</g>.</p><p>Ironically, the membrane created from bacteria also can kill bacteria.</p><blockquote>"If you want to purify water with microorganisms in it, the reduced graphene oxide in the membrane can absorb the sunlight, heat the membrane and kill the bacteria," Singamaneni said.</blockquote><p>Singamaneni and Jun's team exposed the membrane to <em>E. coli </em>bacteria, then shone <g class="gr_ gr_58 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="58" data-gr-id="58">light</g> on the membrane's surface. After being irradiated with light for just 3 minutes, the <em>E. coli</em> bacteria died. The team determined that the membrane quickly heated to above the 70 degrees Celsius required to deteriorate the cell walls of <em>E. coli</em> bacteria. While the bacteria are killed, the researchers had a pristine membrane with a high quality of <g class="gr_ gr_45 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="45" data-gr-id="45">nanocellulose</g> fibers that was able to filter water twice as fast than commercially available ultrafiltration membranes under <g class="gr_ gr_57 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-del replaceWithoutSep" id="57" data-gr-id="57">a high</g> operating pressure.</p><p>When they did the same experiment on a membrane made from bacterial <g class="gr_ gr_42 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling" id="42" data-gr-id="42">nanocellulose</g> without the reduced graphene oxide, the <em>E. coli</em> bacteria stayed alive.</p><p>"This is like 3-D printing with microorganisms," Jun said. "We can add whatever we like to the bacteria <g class="gr_ gr_43 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling ins-del multiReplace" id="43" data-gr-id="43">nanocellulose</g> during its growth. We looked at it under different pH conditions similar to what we encounter in the environment, and these membranes are much more stable compared to membranes prepared by vacuum filtration or spin-coating of graphene oxide."</p><p>While Singamaneni and Jun acknowledge that implementing this process in conventional reverse osmosis systems is challenging, they propose a spiral-wound module system, similar to a roll of towels, that could be equipped with LEDs or a type of nanogenerator that harnesses mechanical energy from the fluid flow to produce light and heat, which would reduce the overall cost.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p> </p><p>Jiang Q, Ghim D, Cao S, Tadepalli S, Liu K-K, Kwon H, Luan J, Min Y, Jun Y-S, Singamaneni S. "Photothermally Active Reduced Graphene Oxide/Bacterial Nanocellulose Composites as Biofouling-Resistant Ultrafiltration Membranes." <em>Environmental Science & Technology.</em> Published online Sept. 14, 2018; print Jan. 2, 2019. <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.est.8b02772">DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.8b02772</a></p><p>This research was supported by funding from the National Science Foundation Environmental Engineering Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Award No. FA9550-15-1-0228); and the McDonnell Academy Global Energy and Environmental Partnership. <br/></p>​<span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Collabo​rators​</h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Singamaneni_Srikanth.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a></strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Srikanth-Singamaneni.aspx"> <strong>​Srikanth Singa​maneni</strong></a><br/></strong></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434; color: #343434;"><li>Expertise: Plasmonic nanostructures for chemical and biological sensors and nanomedicine<br/></li></ul></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Young-Shin-Jun.aspx"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jun_Young-Shin.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>​</a> </strong></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span rtenodeid="2" style="color: #343434; text-align: center;"><a href="/news/Pages/Using-bacteria-to-create-a-water-filter-that-kills-bacteria.aspx" rtenodeid="4"><strong>Young-Shin Jun</strong></a></span><br/></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434; color: #343434;"><li>Expertise: Environmental nanochemistry to address challenges in energy and water by controlling nucleation and reactions at water-solid interfaces<br/></li></ul></div></div></span>​​  ​ <br/>Srikanth Singamaneni and Young-Shin Jun's research on a new water-filtering membrane was the cover story of the Jan. 2, 2019 issue of Environmental Science & Technology.Beth Miller 2019-01-17T06:00:00ZWashU engineers have designed a novel membrane technology that purifies water while preventing biofouling using bacteria.<p>​Srikanth Singamaneni and Young-Shin Jun's research on a new water-filtering membrane was the cover story of the Jan. 2, 2019 issue of Environmental Science & Technology<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/jerina-honored-for-leadership-of-national-symposium.aspx997ASTM honors Jerina for symposium leadership<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jerina_Ken.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Ken <g class="gr_ gr_10 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling ins-del multiReplace" id="10" data-gr-id="10"><g class="gr_ gr_10 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling ins-del multiReplace" id="10" data-gr-id="10">Jerina</g></g>, senior professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science at Washington University in St. Louis, has been recognized for his work leading the Fourth Symposium on Fatigue and Fracture of Metallic Medical Materials and Devices. </p><p>The American Society for Testing and Materials International (ASTM) presented Jerina with an award of appreciation following the symposium, which was held in May 2018 in San Diego. The event aimed to provide presentations on fatigue and fracture mechanics principles involved in metallic medical materials and devices. </p><p>Jerina has previously been recognized by ASTM International. In 2017, the organization awarded him the Coffin-Manson Fatigue Achievement Award, which recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions in the field of fatigue of material.<br/></p>Danielle Lacey2018-12-28T06:00:00ZSenior Professor Ken Jerina received an award of appreciation for his leadership in chairing a national symposium. <p>Senior Professor Ken Jerina received an award of appreciation from the American Society for Testing and Materials International for his efforts chairing a national symposium. <br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Will-the-Defiant-Be-the-Helicopter-That-Finally-Replaces-the-Black-Hawk.aspx998In the media: Will the Defiant Be the Helicopter That Finally Replaces the Black Hawk?<div class="youtube-wrap"><div class="iframe-container"> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yuStvGT1aFA"></iframe><br/><br/> <br/></div></div> <br/><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/sikorsky-boeing-defiant-december-2018-768x512-1545848703.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Two American giants of military development, Sikorsky and Boeing, have teamed up for what they are calling a revolutionary helicopter design. The SB>1 Defiant, in the works for years, is finally getting a debut in pictures. According to a press release, the Defiant is "designed to fly at twice the speed and range of today's conventional helicopters and offers advanced agility and maneuverability." <div><br/>The actual flight launch is scheduled for 2019, even as early as next month.<div><br/>The companies hope that the Defiant is the culmination of a decade-long effort known as the Future Vertical Life (FVL). Started in 2008 as a response to legacy helicopters crashing in Iraq and Afghanistan, the goal was to develop an entirely new rotorcraft system, as opposed to just continually upgrading Black Hawks and Apaches.</div><div> <br/>First made public in 2017, the Defiant "has great potential," according to Swami Karunamoorthy, a professor of engineering at Washington University in St. Louis with a speciality in helicopter dynamics. The strengths that the Defiant brings, Karunamoorthy says, lies in that fact that it doesn't rely on one singular style of propulsion. It's "a hybrid system," he tell PopMech over email.<br/><br/>The hybrid system has a "coaxial rotor design for vertical flight" Karunamoorthy says, "and a pusher propeller system to increase the forward flight speed." A coaxial helicopter design features two sets of helicopter rotors and has been a concept in flight design before flight was a reality, dating back to the 1700s. Working in tandem with a propellor system "may be twice the current speed record as it claims," he says.</div><div><br/><p><a href="https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a25683222/defiant-black-hawk-helictoper/">>> Read the full article on Popular Mechanics</a><br/></p></div></div><div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Swami Karunamoorthy<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Swami-Karunamoorthy.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/karunamoorthy.JPG?RenditionID=3" alt="Swami Karunamoorthy" style="margin: 5px;"/></a> <br/></strong></div><ul style="text-align: left;"><li>Professor of the Practice</li><li>Research: Helicopter Dynamics, Applied Aerodynamics, Mechanics of Solids, Composites, Kinematics, Engineering Education, Assessment methods for program continuous improvement.<br/></li></ul><p style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Swami-Karunamoorthy.aspx">>> View Bio</a><br/></p></div></div> <br/>David Grossman, Popular Mechanicshttps://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a25683222/defiant-black-hawk-helictoper/2018-12-28T06:00:00ZNew pictures and tests next year offer a lot of potential, but not all experts are convinced.<p>​<span style="caret-color: #676767; color: #676767; font-family: "freight sans pro w01", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 20px; letter-spacing: 0.3199999928474426px;">New pictures and tests next year offer a lot of potential, but not all experts are convinced. <a href="https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a25683222/defiant-black-hawk-helictoper/">>> Read the full article on Popular Mechanics</a></span><br/></p>Y

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