https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/These-St-Louis-Scientists-Are-Shaking-Human-Brains-To-Study-Head-Trauma.aspx1231In the media: These St. Louis Scientists Are Shaking Human Brains To Study Head Trauma<img alt="" src="/prospective-students/graduate-admissions/PublishingImages/Phil%20Bayly%20In%20the%20Media%20Head%20Trauma.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​Philip Bayly has spent years trying to figure out the best way to jiggle a brain.  </p><p>The mechanical engineer is part of a team of researchers at Washington University studying how a jolt to the head can shake the brain — the kind of injury a football player suffers when crashing into an opponent. Using a specially-designed device that vibrates volunteers’ heads, they hope to better understand the effects of repeated brain injuries.<br/></p><p>Many people think of the brain as a hard ball bouncing inside your head, Bayly said, but it’s more like soft pink Jello tethered to your skull.  </p><p>“Your brain doesn’t just rattle around loosely,” he said. “It’s connected to the skull by a really intricate system of membranes. I liken it to a bungee jumper, where the cord protects you from a dramatic collision.” </p><p>The membranes offer some cushion to the brain, but even a seemingly minor bump on the head can twist and deform the delicate organ. Repeated head injuries can lead to serious neurodegenerative diseases, including <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/01/18/578355877/repeated-head-hits-not-concussions-may-be-behind-a-type-of-chronic-brain-damage">chronic traumatic encephalopathy</a>. </p><p>Researchers do not recreate brain injuries in the lab because that would be unethical and unsafe for patients. But they can collect data on how the brain moves in response to slight vibrations and use it build mathematical simulations of head trauma, which Bayly calls “virtual crash tests.”<br/></p><div class="wysiwyg-asset-image-wrapper wide" style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 0.78125rem; padding: 0px; width: 663.328125px; float: none; clear: both; z-index: 1;"><div class="wysiwyg-asset-image" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"><a href="https://news.stlpublicradio.org/sites/kwmu/files/styles/placed_wide/public/202001/0105_SF_Brain_04.jpg" class="popup" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: #168dd9; text-decoration: none; line-height: inherit;"><img data-caption="Philip Bayly, professor of mechanical engineering at WashU, helped design a special device to study the movement of live human brains." data-attribution="Credit Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio" src="https://news.stlpublicradio.org/sites/kwmu/files/styles/placed_wide/public/202001/0105_SF_Brain_04.jpg" alt="" style="box-sizing: border-box; display: inline-block; vertical-align: middle; width: 663px; margin: 5px;"/></a><div class="image-meta-wrapper" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0.5rem 13.265625px 0.5rem 6.625px; font-family: lato, "helvetica neue", helvetica, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; line-height: 1.2rem; background-color: transparent;"><div class="cp-si-caption" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; font-size: 0.8rem; font-style: italic; line-height: 1.25rem;">Philip Bayly, professor of mechanical engineering at WashU, helped design a special device to study the movement of live human brains.</div><div class="cp-si-credit" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; color: #919191; font-size: 0.6rem; text-transform: uppercase;">CREDIT SHAHLA FARZAN | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO</div></div></div></div><p style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000;"></p><p>“You can run a simulation on the computer and have someone in a car or playing football and see how that experience is causing their brain to respond,” Bayly said. “But first, we have to provide insight into how those computer models should be built based on rational scientific data, as opposed to just guesswork.” </p><p>Jostling brains for science</p><p>To understand how the live human brain moves, Bayly and his colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine plan to shake dozens of them beginning this year.  </p><p>They’ve designed a special device that cradles and vibrates the head while a volunteer is inside an MRI machine. A loudspeaker vibrates a pillow filled with air under the volunteer’s head, creating a buzzing sensation.  </p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 1.5625rem; padding: 0px; font-family: lato, "helvetica neue", helvetica, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 1.125em; line-height: 1.75em; text-rendering: optimizelegibility; caret-color: #3d3d3d; color: #3d3d3d; letter-spacing: 0.07999999821186066px; word-spacing: 0.4000000059604645px;"></p><div class="wysiwyg-asset-image-wrapper wide" style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 0.78125rem; padding: 0px; width: 663.328125px; float: none; clear: both; z-index: 1;"><div class="wysiwyg-asset-image" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"><a href="https://news.stlpublicradio.org/sites/kwmu/files/styles/placed_wide/public/202001/0105_SF_Brain_03_0.jpg" class="popup" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: #168dd9; text-decoration: none; line-height: inherit;"><img data-caption="A prototype of the device Bayly designed to shake volunteers' brains, with a model of a human head inside. Under the head, a small air-filled pillow is vibrated by a speaker while an MRI machine captures images of the brain as it moves. " data-attribution="Credit Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio" src="https://news.stlpublicradio.org/sites/kwmu/files/styles/placed_wide/public/202001/0105_SF_Brain_03_0.jpg" alt="" style="box-sizing: border-box; display: inline-block; vertical-align: middle; width: 663px; margin: 5px;"/></a><div class="image-meta-wrapper" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0.5rem 13.265625px 0.5rem 6.625px; font-family: lato, "helvetica neue", helvetica, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; line-height: 1.2rem; background-color: transparent;"><div class="cp-si-caption" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; font-size: 0.8rem; font-style: italic; line-height: 1.25rem;">A prototype of the device Bayly designed to shake volunteers' brains, with a model of a human head inside. Under the head, a small air-filled pillow is vibrated by a speaker while an MRI machine captures images of the brain as it moves. </div><div class="cp-si-credit" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; color: #919191; font-size: 0.6rem; text-transform: uppercase;">CREDIT SHAHLA FARZAN | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO</div></div></div></div><p style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000;"></p><p>“If you were at a dance club, feeling the pounding base, it would be similar to this,” said Bayly, holding his hand over a vibrating model of a human head encased in an orange frame.  </p><p>The plastic head is connected to a laptop with a bundle of wires — and with a few keystrokes, WashU graduate student Christie Crandall turns off the vibrations.  </p><p>Although the setup looks simple, the design process has been challenging. For one thing, the team has had to be creative when it comes to which materials they can use. </p><p>“In an MRI, you can’t have anything magnetic, so you can’t use metal,” Crandall said. “There are not a lot of options that are not metal to do this kind of data acquisition.” </p><p>'It's a tangled web'</p><p>The research team will enroll about 100 local men and women ranging from teenagers to people over 50 for one-hour MRI sessions. While the device vibrates their heads for 10 to 15 minutes, the MRI machine will take multiple high-resolution images of their brains. </p><div class="wysiwyg-asset-image-wrapper inset" style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 0.78125rem 0.9375rem; padding: 0px 0px 0px 0.9375rem; width: 331.65625px; float: right; clear: right; z-index: 1;"><div class="wysiwyg-asset-image" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"><a href="https://news.stlpublicradio.org/sites/kwmu/files/styles/card_280/public/202001/0105_SF_Brain_02.jpg" class="popup" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: #168dd9; text-decoration: none; line-height: inherit;"><img data-caption="Christie Crandall, a PhD student in mechanical engineering at Wash U, explains how the device will gently vibrate volunteers' heads while they're inside the MRI machine. " src="https://news.stlpublicradio.org/sites/kwmu/files/styles/card_280/public/202001/0105_SF_Brain_02.jpg" alt="" style="box-sizing: border-box; display: inline-block; vertical-align: middle; width: 317px; margin: 5px;"/></a><div class="image-meta-wrapper" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0.5rem 6.328125px 0.5rem 3.15625px; font-family: lato, "helvetica neue", helvetica, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; line-height: 1.2rem; background-color: transparent;"><div class="cp-si-caption" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; font-size: 0.8rem; font-style: italic; line-height: 1.25rem;">Christie Crandall, a PhD student in mechanical engineering at Wash U, explains how the device will gently vibrate volunteers' heads while they're inside the MRI machine. </div></div></div></div><p style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000;"></p><p>Previous research has often focused on young, healthy adult males, Bayly said.  <br/></p><p>By examining the brains of men and women of various ages, the team hopes future researchers will be able to use the data to understand chronic brain injuries across a broader range of people, including military service members and domestic abuse victims.  </p><p>Bayly has spent more than a decade figuring out how to measure the movement of a live human brain, but he said there are still many questions left to answer.  </p><p>“It’s a tangled web that we’re trying to uncover,” he said. “And we’re trying to uncover it beginning with the mechanics.” <br/></p><p><br/></p><p><a href="https://www.kbia.org/">>> Read the article on KBIA</a><br/></p>Philip Bayly, a mechanical engineer at Washington University, holds a model of a human brain. Bayly is part of a team of engineers and doctors working to better understand brain injuries. SHAHLA FARZAN | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIOShahla Farzan, KBIAhttps://www.kbia.org/post/these-st-louis-scientists-are-shaking-human-brains-study-head-trauma#stream/02020-01-06T06:00:00ZResearch team hopes future researchers will be able to use the data to understand chronic brain injuries across a broader range of people, including military service members and domestic abuse victims.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Plants-model-more-efficient-cooling-method.aspx1225Plants model more efficient cooling method<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Lotus_leaf_with_waterdrops.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><div id="ctl00_PlaceHolderMain_pnlNewsImage" class="floatr displaymodeonly"> <video controls="controls" style="width: 100%; max-width: 854px; height: auto;"><source src="/news/Documents/media.io_Trim%20S2%20Weisensee.mp4" type="video/mp4"></source></video> <br/><p style="color: #666666;">Patricia Weisensee and her lab studied the temperature and evaporative behavior of a drop pinned to a vertical surface.</p></div><p>When drops of water touch the surface of a lotus flower leaf, they form beads and roll off, collecting dust particles along the way. In contrast, water droplets on a rose petal also form beads, but remain pinned to the petal's surface. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis combined the two concepts to find a more efficient way for droplets to evaporate from a surface. </p><p> Patricia Weisensee, assistant professor of mechanical engineering & materials science in the McKelvey School of Engineering, initially planned to establish a pattern on a surface that would both repel liquid, similar to the lotus leaf, or pin droplets, similar to the rose petal, to influence wetting during droplet impact, such as during rain. Like the lotus leaf, when water impacts a repellant or superhydrophobic surface, droplets easily rebound, similar to rain on treated windshields. In heat transfer and evaporation, these superhydrophobic surfaces are very inefficient due to a short contact time between the water and the surface. Conversely, when liquid comes in contact with a hydrophilic surface that can be wetted, it spreads over the surface, forms a liquid puddle and takes a long time to evaporate. Weisensee wanted to create a surface with both repelling and wetting properties that would create small sub-droplets, combining the advantages of both types of surfaces: droplet pinning and evaporation on the wetting surface without the risk of flooding the entire repelling surface. She then observed their behavior to learn more about evaporation as a cooling method for thermal management of high-tech electronic devices.<br/></p><p>Results of her work were published online Dec. 20 in <em>Langmuir</em>. <br/></p><p>Weisensee and her co-authors, Wenliang Qi, a visiting doctoral student from Harbin University in China, and Junhui Li, a McKelvey Engineering doctoral student in mechanical engineering & materials science, placed a single drop of water on a heated horizontal surface that they had designed to have both wetting and repelling properties. Using optical and infrared imaging, they studied the drop's behavior, including how its size and shape evolved as well as its temperature, heat transfer and evaporation rate. <br/></p><p>"On the horizontal surface, everything is nice and symmetrical and behaves the way we would expect it to behave," Weisensee said. "But we decided to put a droplet on a vertical surface, and we saw very different behavior." <br/></p><p>The team created a surface that had a slightly hydrophilic spot in the center of a superhydrophobic surface that kept the drop pinned to the surface. Without the custom pattern, gravity would have caused the drop to roll down the surface. <br/></p><p>"What we saw was that suddenly the thermal signature was not symmetrical anymore, which was the opposite of what we expected," Weisensee said. "We saw lower temperatures at the bottom of the droplet and higher temperatures at the top, which meant that the heat transfer was higher in the bottom than the top despite a higher contact angle and an evaporation-limiting 'wedge effect' of the surrounding air."<br/></p><p>They added small particles to the droplet to be able to see the flow of the convective currents inside.<br/></p><p>"We see that the flow goes from the bottom of the drop to the top, which doesn't make sense from a buoyancy viewpoint because warm water is lighter than cold water," she said. "It should self-stabilize with the colder water staying at the bottom. So clearly the answer to this apparent contradiction must be lying somewhere else." <br/></p><p>Using computational fluid dynamic simulations, the team found that the vapor-saturated air on the heated vertical surface forms a flame shape around the droplet because of the lower density of moist air. <br/></p><p>"This put more vapor on the top because of the flow of the vapor around the droplet," Weisensee said. "When there is more vapor around the top of the droplet, it's not as easy for the water to evaporate because there is already so much vapor, and hence the evaporation rate is limited. At the bottom, however, you constantly get rid of the vapor because it will just rise to the top."<br/></p><p>Because of the modified flow and thermal signature, the evaporation of the vertical droplet is about 10% more efficient than a horizontal droplet, Weisensee said.<br/></p><p>Insights from this work could help to guide future design of spray cooling devices or be used to change particle deposition patterns during evaporation-based fabrication techniques. <br/></p> <SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN> <p>Funding for this research was provided by Washington University in St. Louis and China Scholarship Council (Qi). <br/></p><p>Qi W, Li J, Weisensee P. Evaporation of sessile water droplets on horizontal and vertical bi-phobic patterned surfaces. Langmuir. Published online Dec. 20, 2019. DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.9b02853">https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.9b02853</a><br/></p><p>​<br/></p><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Patricia Weisensee<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Weisensee_Patty.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/> <br/></div><div><ul><li>Expertise: Experimental thermo-fluid dynamics using high speed imaging, including phase change heat transfer, droplet impact, wetting, and capillary transport in porous media<br/></li><li>Research: Weisensee’s work focuses on the interaction of liquids and micro- and nanostructured solids. Her research is both fundamental and applied and spans a wide range of applications in the fluid and thermal sciences, from droplet impact over phase change heat transfer, to electronics cooling.<br/></li></ul><p style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Patricia-Weisensee.aspx?_ga=2.77233303.349713830.1561385933-757045394.1533662676">View Bio</a><br/></p></div></div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage<br/></h3><div> <strong>The Science Times: </strong><a href="https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/24689/20200113/mechanical-material-engineering-science-will-benefit-cooling-method-lotus-flower.htm">Mechanical and Material Engineering Science Will Benefit From the Cooling Method of the Lotus Flower</a><br/></div></div>Beth Miller 2019-12-20T06:00:00ZPatricia Weisensee combined the two conflicting concepts to find a more efficient way for droplets to evaporate from a surface. <p>​McKelvey Engineering mechanical engineer creates bioinspired evaporation technique<br/></p>y
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Top-McKelvey-Engineering-stories-of-2019.aspx1222Top McKelvey Engineering stories of 2019<img alt="top 10 news" src="/news/PublishingImages/top%2010%20stories%202019.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div class="newsauthor"><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/131101_sjh_jim_mckelvey_53.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px; width: 120px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/New-era-in-engineering-to-begin-at-Washington-University.aspx" style="outline: 0px;">1. New era in engineering to begin at Washington University</a><br/></h3></div><div><div data-queryruleid="00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000"><div data-displaytemplate="WebPageItem"><div>The School of Engineering & Applied Science was renamed the James McKelvey School of Engineering in honor of trustee and distinguished alumnus Jim McKelvey Jr., who made an unprecedented and transformative investment in the school.<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newsauthor"><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/jaa_east_end_0082-760x507.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/East-End-Transformation-dedicated.aspx" style="outline: 0px;">2. East End Transformation dedicated</a><br/></h3></div><div><div data-queryruleid="00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000"><div data-displaytemplate="WebPageItem"><div><div class="newsauthor">New campus area focuses on innovative, sustainable design and future reuse.<br/></div></div><div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Biswas_lab_4550.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/Biswas-elected-to-National-Academy-of-Engineering.aspx" style="outline: 0px;">3. Biswas elected to National Academy of Engineering</a> <br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Selected for research in aerosol dynamics, particle removal technologies, Pratim Biswas, the Lucy & Stanley Lopata Professor, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering, considered one of the highest honors in the field of engineering.<br/><br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><br/></div><div class="newsauthor"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Rudy_Yoram.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/></h3><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"><a href="/news/Pages/rudy-named-to-national-academy-of-inventors.aspx">3. Rudy named to National Academy of Inventors</a><br/></h3> Yoram Rudy, along with a faculty member from the School of Medicine, were named to the National Academy of Inventors.<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"></h3><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/silent%20send%20noise.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/When-WiFi-is-weak-send-noise-instead.aspx">4. When WiFi is weak, send noise instead</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Recognizing wireless noise can be key to sending information, researchers find.<br/><br/></div><div class="newsauthor"> <br/> </div><div class="newsauthor"> <br/> </div><div class="newsauthor"> <br/> </div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jun_Young-Shin.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/Using-bacteria-to-create-a-water-filter-that-kills-bacteria.aspx">5. Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Srikanth Singamaneni and Young-Shin Jun's research on a new water-filtering membrane was the cover story of the Jan. 2, 2019 issue of Environmental Science & Technology.<br/></div></div> <br/> </div></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/rendered.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/Multi-institutional-team-to-study-effects-of-age,-gender-on-brain-injury-mechanics.aspx">6. Multi-institutional team to study effects of age, gender on brain injury mechanics</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Study's breadth encompasses often-overlooked group: domestic abuse victims.<br/></div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Flame.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px; width: 120px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/Flame-design-in-space-may-lead-to-soot-free-fire.aspx">7. Flame design in space may lead to soot-free fire</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">The International Space Station will provide a lab for an experiment that hopes to settle fundamental question about soot and combustion.<br/></div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Tumor_Growth_3D_CancerResearch_2017.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/Imaging-technology-could-better-monitor-tumor-growth-drug-effectiveness.aspx">8. Imaging technology could better monitor tumor growth, drug effectiveness</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Using a novel imaging technology, Chao Zhou plans to improve on an existing imaging method that will give researchers more insight into the effects of drug candidates on tumor models.<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/new%20faculty%202019.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/New-faculty-join-McKelvey-School-of-Engineering.aspx">9. New faculty join McKelvey School of Engineering</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Ten new faculty joined the McKelvey School of Engineering, bringing the total number of full-time faculty to more than 140, including 98 tenured and tenure-track faculty. <br/> <br/> <br/> <br/> <h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/noise.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 20px;"/> <a href="/news/Pages/New-fundamental-limit-to-seeing-and-believing-in-imaging.aspx">10. New, fundamental limit to ‘seeing and believing’ in imaging</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">As researchers probe smaller parts of our world, the resulting images may not always show the full picture.<br/></div> <br/> <br/> <br/> </div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div><div class="cstm-section"><h4 class="ms-rteElement-H4B" style="text-align: center;">#mckelveyengineering<br/> top social media<br/> posts of the year</h4> <span><hr/></span> <div><p> <strong>facebook:</strong><strong> </strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/washuengineering/posts/10156354873508095?__xts__%5B0%5D=68.ARC8v4VQkRsNOGF5lt0IKsar4VJiKgeLQE5tnKPtJtn9_uQBplHkNT6V_TXxftIh6Q81xI6QgH44E_3LlbuiKIHT0FSv94LI_RFijMEaRB7k3BiJisKttv-G4yjpRXm4BtbwdHzVwbwEXWYqe0cjaBsHK3l69C2A8o74k3k8-RP3csjTTKWH8MOunXZ8uNq16HhbuOkm2BGn1cDAm4ONPjFIkH39Y7oDUQchqpxrPGuPmZKkj4r-sxVWJIzprSSJxcMHx8sl_0C_MPzjtKmsJhJf8Y_kwq8y5CilGSBkwcfThnRrlSp8HUYdMbkxA5jdxAkezildNvR6T7qQJA&__tn__=-R">Happy Women in Construction Week!</a><br/></p><p> <strong>twitter:</strong><strong> </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/WashUengineers/status/1156285970439913473">Summer Engineering Fellowship program inspired a love of research in Andrew Whitaker, junior in BME.</a><br/></p><p> <strong>instagram: </strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwdBuEsnNS0/">WashU Racing unveils their new ride! 🏁</a><br/></p></div></div><div class="cstm-widget expand"><h3 class="icon-link"> <a href="#">2020 Research Calendar</a></h3><div><p style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/our-school/leadership/offices/marketing-communications/Documents/Engineering%20calendar%202020.pdf"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Calendar-2020.jpg" alt="" style="margin: 5px; width: 135px;"/></a> <br/> <a href="/our-school/leadership/offices/marketing-communications/Documents/Engineering%20calendar%202020.pdf">Download PDF</a><br/></p></div></div><div class="cstm-widget expand"><h3 class="icon-link"> <a href="#">Desktop Calendar Images</a></h3><div><p style="text-align: center;"> <a href="https://wustl.box.com/s/llfxxycbpdky1exeti5p3qd508o05mq0"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/March%202020.jpg" alt="" style="margin: 5px; width: 116px;"/></a> <br/> <a href="https://wustl.box.com/s/llfxxycbpdky1exeti5p3qd508o05mq0">Download</a><br/></p></div></div>2019-12-10T06:00:00ZMcKelvey engineers continued their strong research tradition in 2019. These are 10 stories that had the most impact and reach in 2019.<p>McKelvey<span style="font-size: 20px;"> engineers continued their strong research tradition in 2019. Here are 10 stories that had the most impact and reach in 2019:</span><br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Taking-the-heat-out.aspx1216Taking the heat out<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Figure_3_Modified.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>People around the world rely on high-tech electronic devices for daily business, transportation and communication. But those devices generate heat that has to dissipate for the devices to operate correctly. A mechanical engineer and materials scientist in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis is developing an efficient two-phase cooling technology designed to cool future electronics in data centers, electric vehicles and artificial intelligence servers. </p><p>Damena Agonafer, assistant professor of mechanical engineering & materials science, received a five-year, $500,000 CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation to identify different modes of heat transfer during the evaporation process of nonsymmetrical microdroplets that sit atop micropillar structures on a cooling platform. CAREER awards support junior faculty who model the role of teacher-scholar through outstanding research, excellence in education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organization. One-third of current McKelvey Engineering faculty have received the award.</p><p>Agonafer's hollow micropillar structures, designed to dissipate heat in electronics, hold droplets of liquid on the surface. The bioinspired structure is based on a millennia-old insect called a springtail that can breathe through its skin, even buried in soil, through sharp edges on its surface. Like on the springtail, each droplet on the micropillar has sharp edges that form an energy barrier that keeps the liquid from spilling over. Agonafer has been working on the microstructure since he was a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University and has determined the optimal size and shape of the droplet in previous studies. </p><p>"Now that we have this droplet, we want to study how it behaves and how the evaporation occurs," he said. "We're trying to understand the global and local behavior of asymmetric droplet evaporation."</p><p>Initially, Agonafer worked with circular micropillars on which the droplet was symmetrical in shape. Recently, however, he has been working with asymmetrical micropillars, including triangular or square shaped, to determine any change in the heat transfer performance. In this newly-funded work, he plans to sustain a droplet with a consistent size and shape using a constant pressure microfluidic system. He is working with the university's Office of Technology Management to obtain a patent on his technology. </p><p>"A significant portion of this work is to measure the local temperature and velocity profiles so we can understand what we call the micro-convection effects inside the droplet," he said. "Other studies have focused on how these currents behave in a symmetrical drop, but no one knows how they behave in asymmetric droplets."</p><p>As part of the grant, Agonafer plans work with high-school students underrepresented in the STEM fields by directing a summer research program to incorporate the results from this work into the curriculum designed to teach thermal science, surface science and electronics cooling. In addition, he plans a research experience program for teachers to help them with curriculum development. He also plans to work with industry to expose more undergraduate students to design competitions, as well as to develop a "Face-to-Tech" program to expose more engineering students from backgrounds underrepresented in the STEM fields to technology companies to build a pipeline to internships and jobs in industry. </p><p>Research in Agonafer's Nanoscale Energy and Interfacial Transport (NEIT) lab is funded by Cisco Systems and Google Inc. Earlier this year, he received the Electronics and Photonics Packaging Division 2019 Early Career Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is a faculty adviser to the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, a member of the Center for Solar Energy and Energy Storage and faculty adviser to the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), all at Washington University. </p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>​ <div><div class="cstm-section"><div style="text-align: center;"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; font-family: "open sans", sans-serif; font-size: 1.34em; text-align: center; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: #b0b0b0; padding-bottom: 12px;">Damena Agonafer<br/></h3></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong>  <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Agonafer,%20Damena%20%202018.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/> <br/> </strong></div> <strong></strong> <div><ul style="padding-left: 20px; color: #343434;"><li>Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science<br/></li><li>Expertise: Development of novel materials for phase change heat transfer, thermo-chemical and electrochemical energy storage; Interfacial Transport Phenomena, Micro/Nanofluidics<br/></li><p style="color: #343434; text-align: center;"> <strong></strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Damena-Agonafer.aspx"><strong>View Bio</strong></a><br/></p></ul></div></div> <strong> <br/></strong></div><br/>Evaportation schematic of a non-axisymmetric droplet being continuously replenished through the central hold of a micropillar structure. Beth Miller 2019-12-03T06:00:00ZDamena Agonafer will identify different modes of heat transfer during the evaporation process of nonsymmetrical microdroplets as a way to dissipate heat from electronic devices with an NSF CAREER Award.<p>​Agonafer receives NSF CAREER Award to explore limits of evaporative cooling for electronic devices<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/McKelvey-School-of-Engineering,-partner-universities-offer-collaborative-undergraduate-education-program.aspx1208McKelvey School of Engineering, partner universities offer collaborative undergraduate education program <img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/DSC00384.JPG?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>The McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has teamed with three partner universities in Asia to offer undergraduate students from each school the opportunity to study and to broaden their research experience at WashU. </p><p>In the 3+1+X program, undergraduate students from Tsinghua University, Shandong University and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) who have completed three years of study would have the opportunity to study at Washington University for their fourth year, then have the option to remain at Washington University to complete a one-year master's degree or to begin doctoral studies. Likewise, Washington University students have the same opportunity to attend one of the three universities in Asia for their fourth year and remain for an optional master's or doctoral degree. The visiting students would earn a Certificate of International Study from the host university in addition to a bachelor's degree from their home institution.<br/></p><p>The first student to join a 3+1+X program at the McKelvey School of Engineering is Junlong Huang, a student from Tsinghua University. Huang is studying in the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering this academic year and is being co-advised by Young-Shin Jun, professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering, and Brent Williams, the Raymond R. Tucker Distinguished InCEES Career Development Associate Professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering. Huang's research focuses on the impacts of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system of the UV/Persulfate treatment process. Students from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Shandong University are expected to study at WashU beginning in the 2020-21 academic year. <br/></p><div class="row"><div class="column"></div><div class="column"></div></div><p>"As McKelvey Engineering grows the breadth and depth of its research, we are working to expand our connections to important engineering schools around the globe," said Aaron Bobick, dean and James M. McKelvey Professor. "The 3+1+X program is an innovative approach to fostering great collaboration with key partner universities."</p><p>In addition to the student exchange, the universities plan to host research symposia every one to two years for faculty from each institution, as well as provide visiting scholar opportunities to faculty and doctoral students from each institution. The visiting undergraduate students would have the opportunity to conduct research with faculty from the partner institutions.</p><p> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/3%20plus%201%20plus%20X.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-4" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/> <br/> </p><p> <sub><em>From left: 1) Junlong Huang. 2) Dean Bobick signs an agreement with officials from Tsinghua University in China agreed to the 3+1+X program earlier in 2019. 3) Dean Bobick with Professor Tim Cheng from the School of Engineering at Hong Kong University of Science & Technology.</em></sub><br/></p> <p>"The symposia and visits by partner faculty and doctoral students will enhance the research collaborations between the two institutions, and while it is not mandatory, the hope is that the 3+1+X undergraduate students could be co-advised by faculty from both WashU and the partner institution, further building on the research topics identified in the symposia," said Teresa Sarai, assistant dean for international relations in the McKelvey School of Engineering. <br/></p><p>The McKelvey School of Engineering will team with Tsinghua's internationally prestigious School of Environment, which is among the world's top 20 programs in environmental sciences, specializing in environmental chemistry and microbiology, environmental engineering, and environmental planning and management. Several WashU faculty earned degrees at Tsinghua, including Peng Bai, assistant professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering; Tao Ju, vice dean for research and professor of computer science; and Xuan "Silvia" Zhang, assistant professor of electrical & systems engineering. <br/></p><p>Most departments in the McKelvey School of Engineering will partner with HKUST's School of Engineering. The highly-ranked HKUST is one of the fastest-growing universities in the world. Its School of Engineering is the largest of the four schools within HKUST and was ranked number 18 globally in the QS World University Rankings subject 2019 in Engineering and Technology.<br/></p><p>The partnership with Shandong University will focus primarily on computer science and engineering students from the Taishan College of Shandong University, an elite and highly selective honors college for students in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and computer science. Taishan College serves as a training ground for top-notch students in these basic disciplines. <br/></p><p>"The Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering and the renowned Center for Aerosol Science and Engineering (CASE) have a long-standing relationship with counterparts at Tsinghua University working through the McDonnell Academy Global Energy and Environmental Partnership (MAGEEP)," said Pratim Biswas, assistant vice chancellor, chair of the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering and the Lucy & Stanley Lopata Professor. "This program will enable the brightest undergraduate students to get engaged in cutting-edge research and provide an opportunity to then move onto doctoral programs at either institution, but working with faculty mentors at both universities."<br/></p> <SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN> <br/>Officials from McKelvey School of Engineering and Hong Kong University of Science & Technology signed an agreement for the new program this fall in Hong Kong.Beth Miller 2019-12-02T06:00:00ZMcKelvey School of Engineering and three partner universities in Asia now offer undergraduate students a unique study and research experience.

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