https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Doctoral-student-awarded-Vertical-Flight-Foundation-scholarship.aspx618Doctoral student awarded Vertical Flight Foundation Scholarship <img alt="" src="/Profiles/ResearchImages/shield_red.jpg?RenditionID=7" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p><strong>Michael Malick</strong>, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering & materials science, was awarded a 2017 Vertical Flight Foundation (VFF) scholarship by AHS International, <em>The Vertical Flight Technical Society</em>.<br/><br/>Twenty-four scholarships totaling $80,000 were awarded this year to some of the world’s most talented engineering students interested in vertical flight. Awardees will be recognized at the AHS Grand Awards Banquet on Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The Masters and Doctorate scholarship winners receive $3,000.</p><p>Founded in 1943 as the American Helicopter Society, AHS International today is the world's premier vertical flight technical society. The Society advocates, promotes and supports global vertical flight technology and professional development.<br/></p>2017-04-07T05:00:00ZMichael Malick, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering & materials science, was awarded a 2017 Vertical Flight Foundation (VFF) scholarship by AHS International, The Vertical Flight Technical Society.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-Engineering-honors-distinguished-alumni.aspx600WashU Engineering honors distinguished alumni<p>​WashU Engineering alumni, ranging from civil engineers to aerospace engineers to entrepreneurs were among those who received Alumni Achievement Awards from the School of Engineering & Applied Science March 30 at the Saint Louis Art Museum. <br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20Engineering%20Alumni%20Achiemvent%20AWard.JPG?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><h3>Libby Allman</h3><p>As vice president of manufacturing and product procurement at Hallmark Cards, Libby Allman leads domestic manufacturing and direct global sourcing activities in support of the greetings, home décor, gifts and retail businesses. Results of her leadership and expertise include growth in revenue, leading more than 1,000 employees through major operational change and effective budget management. She led the creation of Hallmark's first collaborative corporate process for IT prioritization and co-founded the Hallmark Women's Network.</p><p>A Kansas City resident, Allman earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering at WashU in 1991, a bachelor's degree in physics from William Jewell College, and an MBA from Rockhurst University.<br/><a href="/alumni/programs-events/alumni-achievement-awards/Pages/2017.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff;">>> Read more and watch video.</a></p><p> <br/></p><h3>Brian Hoelscher</h3><p>Leveraging a 30-year career with engineering and management experience, Brian Hoelscher has led the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) since 2013. As executive director and CEO, he is responsible to execute more than $3 billion in capital improvements while servicing 1.3 million people. Hoelscher has been a steadfast leader, notably driving MSD's Capital Improvement Diversity program. His advocacy for minority- owned and women-owned companies has resulted in more than $43 million in completed construction projects. </p><p>Hoelscher earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from WashU in 1985 while breaking records on the baseball and football teams. <br/><a href="/alumni/programs-events/alumni-achievement-awards/Pages/2017.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff; outline: 0px;">>> Read more and watch video.</a><br/></p><p> <br/></p><h3>Raghu Sugavanam</h3><p>In 2014 Raghu Sugavanam co-founded Interpreta, an analytics company that updates, interprets and synchronizes clinical and genomics data by creating a personalized health-care roadmap. These real-time insights provide physicians, care managers and clients with the patient specific information needed for quality improvement, prioritization, population management and precision medicine. Within two years of its founding, Centene Corp. acquired 19 percent of Interpreta.</p><p>A resident of San Diego, Sugavanam earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, a master's in chemical engineering from WashU in 1978 and a master's in computer science from Rutgers University.<br/><a href="/alumni/programs-events/alumni-achievement-awards/Pages/2017.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff; outline: 0px;">>> Read more and watch video.</a><br/></p><p> <br/></p><h3>Peter Young</h3><p>Peter Young's first position was with Allied-Signal Aerospace as a materials and process engineer. In 1983, Young returned to Hong Kong and founded Chemcentral Group, which provides raw materials and equipment for manufacturers in China. Chemcentral Group has grown into an international trade and investment organization with branches specializing in paper industry products, chemical materials, real estate, ecotourism and recreation. With offices worldwide, Young's companies have remained the largest supplier of coating clay in China since 1984. Young holds stock in PURE brand whisky, brandy and scotch and investments in a hotel and spa property, the Lihua International Hotel & Spa, in Longjing, China.</p><p>A resident of Hong Kong, Young earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from WashU in 1980. He also attended the University of Southern California for graduate work in plastics and engineering.<br/><a href="/alumni/programs-events/alumni-achievement-awards/Pages/2017.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff; outline: 0px;">>> Read more and watch video.</a><br/></p><p> </p><p> </p><h3>Engineering Entrepreneurship Award, Michael Lefenfeld <br/></h3><p>Michael Lefenfeld is co-founder and chief executive officer of New York City-based SiGNa Chemistry, a global manufacturer of highly-active, environmentally friendly chemicals. SiGNa's products are used to improve production processes in the energy recovery, petrochemical refining and chemical manufacturing industries. His work has led to safer industrial environments, better medical technologies and more effective, affordable energy solutions. Prior to SiGNa, Lefenfeld developed and commercialized several new technologies, launching and selling three companies by age 30. Lefenfeld holds more than 50 patents in medical devices, controlled release, electronics, chemical reactivity and information technology.</p><p>After earning a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering at WashU in 2002, Lefenfeld, a resident of New York City, earned a master's in chemistry at Columbia University and an executive education certificate at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business.<br/><a href="/alumni/programs-events/alumni-achievement-awards/Pages/2017.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff; outline: 0px;">>> Read more and watch video.</a><br/></p><p> <br/></p><h3>Dean's Award, David & Carol Gast</h3><p>As undergraduates and St. Louis natives, David and Carol Gast met at a football game. David made a business of installing sound systems around campus, including the first system in Graham Chapel. David continued his entrepreneurial streak after a stint in the U.S. Army, where then-Lieutenant Gast was an instructor in the Guided Missile School. He later joined the electrical and mechanical industrial equipment sales firm Carl F. Gast Co., which his parents had founded in 1935. After starting as a salesman, he became CEO. Carol later became the bookkeeper for the firm. Since Gast's retirement in 2005, the company is managed by third-generation owners.</p><p>The Gasts have generously supported annual engineering scholarships and the Gast Window in Preston M. Green Hall and have made an estate commitment to endow a professorship in the School of Engineering & Applied Science. </p><p>David earned bachelor's degrees in physics and in electrical engineering in 1953 and a master's in electrical engineering in 1954 from WashU. Carol was in the Liberal Arts class of 1956.<br/><a href="/alumni/programs-events/alumni-achievement-awards/Pages/2017.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff; outline: 0px;">>> Read more and watch video.</a><br/></p><p> <br/> </p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Awardee Videos<br/></h3><div><ul><li> <a class="nothumblink button" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxiOlVnJioQ">Libby Allman</a><br/></li><li> <a class="nothumblink button" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VXLBnkUb4g">Brian Hoelscher</a><br/></li><li> <a class="nothumblink button" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJxU3BklvbE&index=4&list=PLysD4ocsusqpH0TyzSJtnyaP4XRYfR-eM">Raghu Sugavanam</a><br/></li><li> <a class="nothumblink button" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEnvRRf6xXs">Peter Young</a><br/></li><li> <a class="nothumblink button" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_mZOwsxrGs&t=2s">Michael Lefenfeld</a><br/></li><li> <a class="nothumblink button" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8P5KvXihA8">David & Carol Gast</a><br/></li></ul></div></div></span>L to R: Michael Lefenfeld, David Gast, Peter Young, Libby Allman, Carol Gast, Raghu Sugavanam, Brian Hoelscher2017-04-05T05:00:00ZAlumni, ranging from civil engineers to aerospace engineers to entrepreneurs were among those who received Alumni Achievement Awards.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/3-D-brain-maps-to-guide-neurosurgeries.aspx605$3.6 million to fund personalized 3-D brain maps to guide neurosurgeries<p>​Removing a brain tumor requires walking a fine line: Remove too little, and the disease remains; remove too much, and sight, speech or movement may be impaired.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20Engineering%203-D%20brain%20map.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>To help strike that delicate balance, neurosurgeries often are performed with the aid of 3-D maps of patients’ brains. But such maps typically show anatomical landmarks and don’t indicate where critical brain functions such as language and motor function are found.</p><p>Now, a $3.6 million grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will fund a collaboration between researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Medtronic, maker of a neurosurgery navigational system that enables physicians to track where they are operating in relation to the patient’s brain anatomy. Together, the researchers will create a software program that uses information from MRI scans to build personalized 3-D maps of the location of brain functions, and integrates that information – along with an anatomic map – into a navigational system. These integrated maps can allow physicians to plan and perform surgeries more accurately and safely.</p><blockquote>“Every neurosurgeon uses a navigation system, but we want it to be even better,” said Eric Leuthardt, MD, a professor of neurosurgery and of mechanical engineering and applied science, and the co-principal investigator on the grant. “We want to give them the ability not only to navigate the brain anatomy, but to know the implications of making incisions into each of those components of anatomy.”</blockquote><p>When a part of the brain needs to be removed because of a tumor or other brain disease such as uncontrollable epilepsy, patients routinely undergo an MRI scan before the surgery to map the brain’s anatomy surrounding the portion to be removed.</p><p>However, mapping the functions those brain areas control is more difficult. The gold standard is cortical stimulation, in which doctors awaken patients during surgery and ask them to perform simple tasks – such as repeating a word – while they apply tiny electrical currents to the exposed surface of the brain. If the applied electrical stimulation interferes with a patient’s speech, the doctors know they have found a speech-related area of the brain.</p><p>But not everyone can be safely awakened during surgery, and some of those who can be awakened would really rather not be. Young children cannot undergo surgeries while awake or cooperate with the tasks. And the extent of damage to the brain caused by diseases such as brain tumors and epilepsy can make some adults unable to perform the tasks as well.</p><p>Leuthardt, with co-principal investigator Joshua Shimony, MD, an associate professor of radiology, and colleagues from neurosurgery and neuroradiology, have developed a technique to map functional areas of the brain in advance of surgery. The technique works on people of all ages and doesn’t require a patient to perform tasks.</p><p>Called resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI), the technique relies on the fact that the brain is always active, even when a person is daydreaming, sleeping or even unconscious. You may not be moving, or even thinking about moving, but the left side of the motor area of your brain is busily communicating with the right. By identifying which parts of the brain are in communication, scientists can delineate functional networks.</p><blockquote>“We have found a better way to create these functional maps, but even if we have them, the way functional information is handled can be very primitive,” Shimony said. “In many hospitals, the radiologist produces pictures of where on the brain the motor system is, where the language system is, where they are located relative to the surgical site, etc., but the information is not always well-integrated into the surgical navigation system.”</blockquote> <p>The NIH grant will allow Leuthardt and Shimony to integrate data from resting state functional scans into the Medtronic navigational system to make a 3-D structural and functional map of each patient’s brain.</p><p>A decade ago, Shimony and Leuthardt led a project – with the cooperation of Medtronic ­– to interface with the company’s StealthStation navigational system ­that is routinely used during neurosurgeries at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, where the two practice medicine. They set up the machine so it could take resting state functional data and produce individualized functional maps.</p><p>The system has reduced by one-third the number of surgeries at Barnes-Jewish performed while patients are awake and is popular among neurosurgeons there. But it requires a full-time employee with specialized expertise to analyze the data and help produce the functional maps.</p><p>The researchers reasoned that if resting state functional imaging were going to become a standard part of neurosurgical practice, it would be necessary to produce a user-friendly software program that does not require specialized training to operate. A key advance was made by MD/PhD student Carl Hacker, PhD, who figured out how to automate the analysis of resting state functional data so that it could be processed by an algorithm rather than an expert.</p><p>“We’re creating a software package that is going to combine our expertise in interpreting resting state data with the navigational technology at Medtronic, so that anyone who wants to use resting state MRI to map functional areas, or to make a brain map for use in surgical planning, can have that readily available,” Leuthardt said. “We think it will be a win-win situation.”<br/></p><p> <br/> </p> <span><hr/></span> <p>Washington University School of Medicine’s 2,100 employed and volunteer faculty physicians also are the medical staff of Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children’s hospitals. The School of Medicine is one of the leading medical research, teaching and patient-care institutions in the nation, currently ranked seventh in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Through its affiliations with Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children’s hospitals, the School of Medicine is linked to BJC HealthCare.<br/></p>Neurosurgeons must avoid cutting into parts of the brain responsible for key functions such as language (orange) and vision (green), but individuals vary in where such functions are located (each of the top images compared with the bottom images above).Tamara Bhandari https://source.wustl.edu/2017/04/3-6-million-fund-personalized-3-d-brain-maps-guide-neurosurgeries/2017-04-05T05:00:00ZA $3.6 million grant will fund a collaboration between School of Medicine researchers and the maker of a neurosurgery navigational system. They will create a software program to build personalized 3-D maps of the location of brain function.<p>​</p><p>Academic-industry partnership aims to improve brain surgery<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Studying-the-brains-suspension-system-in-TBIs.aspx598Studying the brain’s suspension system in TBIs<p>​Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, can be devastating and debilitating. Despite intense interest and years of study, the exact mechanisms linking force and neurological injury remain unclear. Researchers know that the membranes separating the skull from the brain play a key role in absorbing shock and preventing damage caused during a head impact, but the details remain largely mysterious.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Brain-Curl-copy.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/News/34_.000">a</a></div><p style="text-align: left;">​New research from a team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis takes a closer look at this “suspension system” and the insight it could provide to limit or perhaps prevent TBI.<br/></p><p>“The idea was to find out how protective are the layers of membranes that connect the brain to the skull,” said <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Philip-Bayly.aspx">Philip Bayly</a>, the Lilyan & E. Lisle Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering and chair of the Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science Department at the School of Engineering & Applied Science. “They serve the same function as the suspension in your car. When you go over a bump in a car, there’s a big oscillation of the wheels but you get very little motion in your body because the suspension absorbs it.</p><blockquote>“We know that the membranes are there to cushion the brain, but by how much, and what’s the variation from person to person?”</blockquote><p>During the study, researchers used an imaging technique called magnetic resonance elastography, or MRE, on six volunteers. During MRE, tiny skull vibrations are introduced through a vibrating pillow and measured with sensors embedded in a mouthguard. The motion of the brain was then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. When compared to a gelatin model that showed significant force transfer, the six subjects’ skull-brain interface significantly delayed and weakened the transfer of motion from skull to brain.<br/></p> <iframe width="640" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/U5NGGf-hmkg?ecver=1" frameborder="0"></iframe><div style="text-align: center;"> </div><p>“We’re putting numbers to it, quantifying how much protection is actually there,” Bayly said. “During our study, 90 percent of the motion to the brain was attenuated.”</p><p>The next steps: eliminating the need for the mouthguard-sensor system and developing a more streamlined MRE method, which could enable a larger study with many more subjects.</p><p>“This would allow us to examine factors such as age or gender as variables when it comes to traumatic brain injury, and see who might be more susceptible to such injuries,” Bayly said.</p><p>The research was recently accepted by the <a href="https://biomechanical.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/article.aspx?articleid=2610238">Journal of Biomechanical Engineering</a>, and is now available online.</p><p>Financial support for the study was provided by the National Institutes of Health Grant R01 NS055951<br/></p> <SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN> <p> <br/> </p><p>​<br/></p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Philip Bayly<br/></h3><div><p style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Philip-Bayly.aspx"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Bayly_Phil.jpg?RenditionID=3" class="ms-rtePosition-4" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a> <br/></p><div style="text-align: center;"><div style="text-align: center;"> Professor Bayly develops imaging methods to study biomechanics from cell motility to traumatic brain injury. </div> <br/> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Philip-Bayly.aspx">View Bio</a></div></div></div></span><br/> <div> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage<br/></h3><div> Scicasts: <a href="https://scicasts.com/channels/bio-it/1848-bioimaging-simulation/12460-researchers-take-a-closer-look-at-brain-s-suspension-system-in-tbis/">Researchers Take a Closer Look at Brain's Suspension System in TBIs</a><br/></div><div> <br/>Technology Networks: <a href="https://www.technologynetworks.com/TN/news/studying-the-brains-suspension-system-in-tbis-287232">Studying the Brain’s Suspension System in TBIs</a><br/></div></div></span><br/></div>The top row of images shows displacement of brain tissue as observed in the new research; the bottom row shows "curl," or change in shape. (Credit: Bayly Lab)Erika Ebsworth-Goold https://source.wustl.edu/2017/04/studying-brains-suspension-system-tbis/2017-04-04T05:00:00ZNew research from a team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis takes a closer at this “suspension system” and the insight it could provide to prevent TBI.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Peters-receives-Honorary-Fellow-Award-from-AHS-International.aspx597Peters receives Honorary Fellow Award from AHS International<p>​<a href="https://mems.wustl.edu/faculty/Pages/default.aspx?bio=92">David Peters</a>, professor of mechanical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, has been chosen to receive the Honorary Fellow Award from AHS International (the Vertical Flight Technical Society).<br/></p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Peters_David.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​The award is given to a Society member whose career-based leadership, vision or other contribution has significantly advanced the interests of the vertical flight community. Peters will receive the award in May at a Society event in Texas.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Peters, the McDonnell Douglas Professor of Engineering, was previously named a Technical Fellow of the Society, and in 2008 was awarded the society’s Alexander A. Nikolsky Honorary Lectureship.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Peters is the director of graduate studies for the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science and the associate director of the Georgia Institute of Technology/Washington University Center of Excellence for Rotor Technology. He also is an adjunct professor at Georgia Tech, where he taught previously.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Peters' research projects in rotor wake modeling seek to correctly model the dynamics and aerodynamics that profoundly influence the response of airplane propellers, helicopters and tilt rotors. His other research interests include aeroelastic modeling of helicopter rotors and wind turbines with unsteady aerodynamics and nonlinear structural deformations and response to stalling.<br/></p>David Peters2017-03-28T05:00:00ZThe award is given to a Society member whose career-based leadership, vision or other contribution has significantly advanced the interests of the vertical flight community.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Lake-receives-Early-Career-Award-from-the-Journal-of-Orthopaedic-Research.aspx608Lake receives Early Career Award from the Journal of Orthopaedic Research<p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Spencer-Lake.aspx">Spencer Lake</a>, an engineer in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, has been selected to receive the 2016 Early Career Award from the Journal of Orthopaedic Research.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Spencer%20Lake.png?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>The award highlights the work of a researcher early in his or her career who published a paper in the journal in the prior calendar year. Lake was lead author of a paper published January 2016, titled “Development and Use of an Animal Model to Study Post-Traumatic Stiffness and Contracture of the Elbow.”</p><p style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman";"></p><p>As a biomechanical engineer and assistant professor of mechanical engineering & materials science, Lake studies the biological and structural properties of stiff elbows to determine how changes to the connective tissues around the joint relate to its mechanics. In addition, he looks for the causes of long-term elbow contracture, tightness or reduced function after the joint has been made immobile following injury and how that alters biological and structural properties of tissues within the joint.</p><p style="font-size: medium; color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman";"></p><p>Lake is the first recipient of the award.<br/></p>2017-03-23T05:00:00ZLake studies the biological and structural properties of stiff elbows to determine how changes to the connective tissues around the joint relate to its mechanics.

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